chemiosmosis

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chemiosmosis

(ˌkɛmɪɒzˈməʊsɪs) or

chemosmosis

n
1. (Biochemistry) biochem the mechanism by which the synthesis and utilization of the biochemical energy source ATP is regulated: the energy generated by oxidative phosphorylation generates a proton gradient across the membrane of the mitochondrion that drives the enzymic resynthesis of ATP
2. (Chemistry) a chemical reaction between two compounds after osmosis through an intervening semipermeable membrane
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Translations
quimiosmosis
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References in periodicals archive ?
The foundations of this view of the biological interconversion of energy are embodied in the chemiosmotic hypothesis published by Dr Peter Mitchell in 1961 [1] and outlined briefly below.
While much remains to be understood about the mechanisms of biological energy transduction, our purpose here is to discuss what the story behind the chemiosmotic hypothesis illustrates about the nature of science and the attitudes of scientists towards unorthodox ideas.
The chemiosmotic hypothesis is based on four postulates, which we paraphrase from Mitchell [1]: