chemokine

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che·mo·kine

 (kē′mō-kīn′, kĕm′ō-)
n.
Any of various chemotactic cytokines that are released by several cell types and act to attract monocytes, neutrophils, and other white blood cells to sites of injury or inflammation.

chemokine

(ˈkiːməʊˌkaɪn)
n
a type of protein produced during inflammation that activates white blood cells
References in periodicals archive ?
Blood vessel dilation causes a decrease in local blood flow, and activated neutrophils, attracted by the chemokines, attach to the chemotactant proteins, squeeze themselves through the endothelial cell walls of the locally dilated blood vessels, and follow the scent of the chemokines to the site of damage (for additional information, see Schmidt 2005).
The results indicated increased expression of genes encoding proteins involved in stress, hypoxic responses, immune and inflammatory responses, responses to tissue injury and tissue repair, cytokines, and chemokines.
Chemokines are chemicals that guide immune cells around a body, and receptors allow the cells to detect the compounds.
Furthermore, gp120 elicits a number of functional responses in macrophages, such as secretion of chemokines and other soluble products, and we demonstrate that specific pathways linked to the chemokine receptors are responsible.
T487 acts by inhibiting the binding of specific chemokines to receptor sites on the surface of inflammatory cells known as lymphocytes.
But the beta Chemokines only block some HIV viruses, those that use the CCR5 receptor on the CD4 cell to enter the cell--not viruses that use the CXCR4 receptor, which often evolve later in HIV infection.
In one study, scientists at The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio examined mutations in genes for immune molecules called chemokines and chemokine receptors in 1,090 individuals infected with HIV-1.
Gallo's team at the Institute of Human Virology at the University of Maryland, Baltimore, earlier identified three similar molecules, all called chemokines.
The Company has initially applied this technology to chemokines, a large class of pro-inflammatory and pro-migratory proteins, which can be modified using the technology, converting them into anti-inflammatory decoy proteins.
Chemokines play a crucial role to recruit leukocyte subsets migration through the endothelium and into liver against the virus during the progression of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection.
Background: Increased proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines might contribute to infiltration of inflammatory cells and remodeling in airways of asthma.