Cherenkov


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Cherenkov

(tʃɪˈrɛŋkɒf; Russian tʃɪˈrjenkəf) or

Cerenkov

n
(Biography) Pavel Alekseyevich (ˈpavɪl alɪkˈsjejɪvitʃ). 1904–90, Soviet physicist: noted for work on the effects produced by high-energy particles: shared Nobel prize for physics 1958
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Using the High Altitude Water Cherenkov Gamma-Ray Observatory, a different team of researchers collected readings of gamma rays exceeding 100 trillion electron volts.
Yes, nuclear reactors can produce a blue hue, from something called Cherenkov radiation, but no, there's no way Unit 4 would have looked like the "Tribute in Light" in Lower Manhattan on the anniversary of September 11.C In the end, though, none of this really matters.
On 2012 July 26 a further telescope, with a 28-m mirror, was added, making it the largest Cherenkov telescope ever built.
Although Mikhailo Cherenkov claimed that "not a single memory of those years will remain," official statistics demonstrate that the number of those in Russia who rely on God and who believe in miracles and in life after death has increased considerably in the past 25 years (1991-2016).
Supporting Cherenkov Telescope Array in unlocking the mysteries of the Universe through gamma ray observation
But to be absolutely sure, we'll probably have to wait for far more sensitive gamma ray observations with the Cherenkov Telescope Array, the next gamma ray observatory now under construction in Chile."
The Spartak trickster Fedor Cherenkov inspired his many admirers but rarely played for the national team.
Many Arctic sea birds, such as Velvet Scoter (Melanitta fusca), Common Eider (Somateria mollissima), Arctic Tern (Sterna paradisaea), Ruddy Turnstone (Arenaria interpres), Ringed Plover (Charadrius hiaticula), Razorbill (Alca torda), and Black Guillemot (Cepphus grylle), are widely spread and breed in the eastern part of the Gulf of Finland and in the Baltic Sea (Cramp and Simmons, 1978; Malchevsky and Pukinsky, 1983; Bubyreva et al., 1993; Noskov et al., 1993; Iovchenko et al., 2002; Shilin et al., 2014; Cherenkov et al., 2016).
In the 1970s and 1980s, aerogel was used in Cherenkov detectors and to store rocket fuel.
It detects neutrino through the Cherenkov radiation emitted by a charged particle created via neutrino interaction.