Cherokee rose


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Related to Cherokee rose: Trail of Tears, Confederate rose, State flowers

Cherokee rose

n.
A prickly climbing evergreen rose (Rosa laevigata) native to China and naturalized in the southeast United States, having showy white fragrant flowers.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Cherokee rose

n
(Plants) an evergreen climbing Chinese rose, Rosa laevigata, that now grows wild in the southern US, having large white fragrant flowers
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Cher′okee rose′


n.
the fragrant white rose of a prickly, climbing shrub, Rosa laevigata, orig. from China and naturalized in the southern U.S.: the state flower of Georgia.
[1815–25, Amer.]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Cherokee rose - Chinese climbing rose with fragrant white blossomsCherokee rose - Chinese climbing rose with fragrant white blossoms
rose, rosebush - any of many shrubs of the genus Rosa that bear roses
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in classic literature ?
But the wall was clearest crystal; and Sarah was looking down a grassy lane shaded with cherry trees and elms and bordered with raspberry bushes and Cherokee roses.
MH: The setting for your novel, "The Cherokee Rose," bears a strong resemblance to the Vann house.
Synopsis: In her novel "The Cherokee Rose", author and historian Tiya Miles examines a little-known aspect of America's past slaveholding by Southern Creeks and Cherokees and its legacy as reflected in the lives of three young women who are drawn to the Georgia plantation where scenes of extreme cruelty and equally extraordinary compassion once played out.
With The Cherokee Rose, Tiya Miles has written a complex and suspenseful tale of the Old South, the modern world, and how history is always with us.
She became known as the "Cherokee Rose" or "White Rose" or "Wild Rose," the "Pocahontas of the West," and a Cherokee "princess and prophetess" by those who believed her to be "the constant friend of the American pioneer." (3) So enthralled did white Americans become with the image of her as the savior of white settlers that they styled her the "patron saint of Tennessee," and the Daughters of the American Revolution named a chapter in Chattanooga, Tennessee, after her.
Spanning from 1700 to 2013, here are illustrated chapter biographies of: Mary Musgrove, Empress of the Creeks; Nancy Ward, the Cherokee Rose; Susette La Flesche, Omaha "Bright Eyes;" Emily Pauline Johnson, "The Mohawk Princess;" Mountain Wolf Woman, an honored Ho-Chunk woman; Rosebud Yellow Robe, Lakota Sioux Storyteller; Annie Dodge Wauneka, Navajo Healer; Maria Tallchief, Osage Ballerina; and Wilma Mankiller, Cherokee Chief.
Previously, the last Dubai-owned horse to win the Group 1 contest was Cherokee Rose, who carried His Highness Shaikh Mohammad Bin Rashid Al Maktoum, Vice President and Prime Minister of the UAE and Ruler of Dubai, to victory in 1995.
Mesopotamia's daughter Garden Of Eden bred the top American turf runner Galaxy Libra as well as Listed winner Welsh Garden, who in turn bred the Group 1-winning stayer Molesnes and became the granddam of Haydock Sprint Cup heroine Cherokee Rose. Other noted descendants of Garden Of Eden include San Sebastian and Alkaased, winners of the Prix Royal-Oak and Japan Cup.
A daughter of Exceed And Excel and Group One-winning sprinter Cherokee Rose, Trail Of Tears was a narrow second on her first racecourse appearance earlier this month and should be a little more streetwise this time.
"Any fool knows you can grow whatever you want in this part of Florida, as long as it's grafted onto the root of a Cherokee rose. It's indigenous, you see -- been here all along.
Harper's Trial and Triumph, and newspapers such as A Wreath of Cherokee Rose Buds, the author explains how the works present academic instruction and "collateral learning": In and through these works, schoolgirls absorb the "expectations of adult women" and develop attitudes about "intellectual work, marriage, sexuality, self-expression, and vocation" (6).
"Even my super-conservative grandmother is totally okay with it," one performer, Cherokee Rose, said of her work with L'amour's troupe, the Chicago Starlets.