Cheshire


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Related to Cheshire: Cheshire cat

Chesh·ire

also chesh·ire  (chĕsh′ər)
n.
A hard yellow English cheese made from cow's milk.

[After Cheshire, a county of west-central England.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Cheshire

(ˈtʃɛʃə; ˈtʃɛʃɪə)
n
(Placename) a former administrative county of NW England; administered since 2009 by the unitary authorities of Cheshire West and Chester, and Cheshire East: low-lying and undulating, bordering on the Pennines in the east; mainly agricultural: the geographic and ceremonial county includes Warrington and Halton, which became independent unitary authorities in 1998. Area 2077 sq km (802 sq miles). Abbreviation: Ches

Cheshire

(ˈtʃɛʃə)
n
(Biography) Group Captain (Geoffrey) Leonard. 1917–92, British philanthropist: awarded the Victoria Cross in World War II; founded the Leonard Cheshire Foundation Homes for the Disabled: married Sue, Baroness Ryder
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Chesh•ire

(ˈtʃɛʃ ər, -ɪər)

n.
a county in NW England. 966,500; 899 sq. mi. (2328 sq. km).
Formerly, Chester.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in classic literature ?
`It's a Cheshire cat,' said the Duchess, `and that's why.
"I want to take you first to see a remarkable relic of Mercia, and then we'll go to Liverpool through what is called 'The Great Vale of Cheshire.' You may be disappointed, but take care not to prepare your mind"--this to Adam--"for anything stupendous or heroic.
(like the smile of the Cheshire cat) and attached cuffs; and that was all.
His breakfast consisted of a side-dish, a broiled fish with Reading sauce, a scarlet slice of roast beef garnished with mushrooms, a rhubarb and gooseberry tart, and a morsel of Cheshire cheese, the whole being washed down with several cups of tea, for which the Reform is famous.
Then followed the history and rise of the ancient and respectable family, in the usual terms; how it had been first settled in Cheshire; how mentioned in Dugdale, serving the office of high sheriff, representing a borough in three successive parliaments, exertions of loyalty, and dignity of baronet, in the first year of Charles II, with all the Marys and Elizabeths they had married; forming altogether two handsome duodecimo pages, and concluding with the arms and motto:--"Principal seat, Kellynch Hall, in the county of Somerset," and Sir Walter's handwriting again in this finale:--
"D'you know where Langstroth, Root and Cheshire, live if you happen to want em?
Cheshire, with his irons, trying to make people straight when the Almighty had made them crooked."
I sat for hours in the little parlour of Cheshire Cheese thinking over the best way.
There are Norburys in Cheshire and in Wiltshire, and also, as I have heard, upon the borders.
He gives Dutch cheese, too, eating Cheshire, sir, himself; and Sundays out, are only once a month.'
And I tell you what, Sir, if I hadn't more of these qualities that commonly endear man to man, than our articled clerk has, I'd steal a Cheshire cheese, tie it round my neck, and drown myself.
``Well, then,'' answered Father Dennet, ``a holy brother came to visit the Sacristan at Saint Edmund's a sort of hedge-priest is the visitor, and kills half the deer that are stolen in the forest, who loves the tinkling of a pint-pot better than the sacring-bell, and deems a flitch of bacon worth ten of his breviary; for the rest, a good fellow and a merry, who will flourish a quarter-staff, draw a bow, and dance a Cheshire round, with e'er a man in Yorkshire.''

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