chest compression


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

chest compression

n
the application of pressure to the chest to prevent it from expanding, used in cardiopulmonary resuscitation
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
HOW TO GIVE CHEST COMPRESSION TO A BABY PLACE two fingertips on the centre of the baby's chest.
Tenders are invited for Lucas 2 Chest Compression System And Related Items
Standard cardiopulmonary resuscitation (S-CPR) refers to the entire body of techniques of external chest compression and securing positive pressure ventilation for the purpose of achieving adequate blood and oxygen flow into vital organs such as the heart and brain following cardiac arrest (1).
New guidelines on cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and emergency cardiovascular care (ECC) set upper limits on chest compression rate and depth, add naloxone to the care of suspected opioid abusers, and remove vasopressin from the advanced cardiac life support (ACLS) algorithm.
Imagine learning to resuscitate someone to the musical rhythm of chest compression rate, demonstrated by trained paramedics masquerading as musical performers
sup][1] Recently, the use of a novel mechanical chest compression device, Lund University Cardiopulmonary Assist System (LUCAS, Jolife AB, Lund, Sweden), has been shown to sustain both coronary and cerebral circulation despite cardiac arrest and it may be possible to allow for continued PCI despite ongoing cardiac or circulatory arrest with artificially sustained circulation.
American Heart Association (AHA) 2010 resuscitation guidelines emphasize the importance of performing high-quality CPR and recommend that for CPR to be of a high quality the chest compression depth should be at least 2.
Airway, Breathing, and Chest Compression to "C-A-B" i.
That premise - short and precise, like the chest compression process itself - is key to understanding what Moore and others are trying to do with a public education campaign they call ACT:C3.
Any delay in chest compression, either by bystanders squeamish about mouth-to-mouth or clinicians searching for ventilation equipment, increases the risk of death, the statement noted.
Chest compression fraction determines survival in patients with out-of-hospital ventricular fibrillation.
The Hoke and Chamberlain review (9) concluded that there are no sound methodological studies on thoracic fractures resulting from chest compression and the studies that are available do not permit interstudy comparison.