miracle play

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Related to Chester Plays: Towneley Plays, York Plays

miracle play

n.
A medieval drama portraying events in the lives of saints and martyrs.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

miracle play

n
(Theatre) a medieval play based on a biblical story or the life of a saint. Compare mystery play
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

mir′acle play`


n.
a medieval drama based on a Bible story, a saint's life, or the like, usu. presented as part of a series or cycle. Compare morality play, mystery play.
[1850–55]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

miracle play

A medieval religious drama that re-enacted miraculous incidents from the lives of saints on the day dedicated to them.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.miracle play - a medieval play representing episodes from the life of a saint or martyrmiracle play - a medieval play representing episodes from the life of a saint or martyr
drama, dramatic play, play - a dramatic work intended for performance by actors on a stage; "he wrote several plays but only one was produced on Broadway"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

miracle play

n (Theatre) → miracolo
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
On one occasion the Pope promised the remission of a thousand days of purgatory to all persons who should be present at the Chester plays, and to this exemption the bishop of Chester added sixty days more.
The Chester plays stopped after the Reformation in the 16th century, but were revived in 1951 and are a current triumph as they include many of the local community working with professionals to recreate the stories.
Part 1 of the collection, 'The Chester Script', begins with Alexandra Johnston's 'The Text of the Chester Plays in 1572: A Conjectural Re-Construction'.
Tomorrow: Paul Vernon Chester plays the Rush Hour Blues, Symphony Hall foyer from 5.30pm.
The York, Towneley and Chester plays seem to have followed a popular medieval tradition, both oral and visual, of a ferocious and aggressive woman who rebels against her usually quiet and acquiescent husband only to be brought back into the fold upon learning a proper moral and spiritual lesson.
In Sacred Players, Heather Hill-Vasquez argues with reference to the Chester plays' 1562 Banns that the sixteenth century's preservation of Middle English religious drama, marshalled originally by a Catholic ecclesia for the affirmation of Catholic beliefs and sacramental practices such as Eucharistic transubstantiation, marks a reworking of medieval religious drama to suit Protestant sensibilities.
Disciplines and topics include theater history, with articles on historical fiction and teaching the Whisun plays of Tudor Chester; performance preparation, with articles on research, teaching without texts, and using the Chester plays in the classroom and performance; English literature, including using Elizabethan and Jacobean church court cases and teaching poems by Herrick; social history, including using REED documents to teach early modern English history and women's studies as well as paleography; and language history, including teaching diachronic linguistics and language.
The 2008 series will be under the direction of artistic director Robin Goddard who studied drama and dance at Exeter University and is something of a veteran of the Chester plays.
Also included in her investigation of jesting culture are accounts of public events such as Horn Fairs and skimmingtons, which Brown reads as unscripted performances of events reflected in early dramas ranging from the Chester plays of Noah and his wife to The Merry Wives of Windsor and The Alchemist.
In two of the Chester plays, however, it may be possible to detect references to this theme that would attest to its former popularity.
Chester plays A 14th-century cycle of 25 scriptural, or mystery, plays, performed at the prosperous city of Chester, in the north of England, during the Middle Ages.

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