Chester

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Ches·ter

 (chĕs′tər)
A city of west-central England on the Dee River south of Liverpool. Built on the site of a Roman fortress, it is noted for its many well-preserved half-timbered buildings.

Chester

(ˈtʃɛstə)
n
(Placename) a city in NW England, administrative centre of the unitary authority of Cheshire West and Chester, on the River Dee: intact surrounding walls; 16th- and 17th-century double-tier shops. Pop: 80 121 (2001). Latin name: Deva

Ches•ter

(ˈtʃɛs tər)

n.
1. a city in Cheshire, in NW England: intact Roman walls. 120,800.
2. former name of Cheshire.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Chester - a city of southeastern Pennsylvania on the Delaware river (an industrial suburb of Philadelphia)
Commodore John Barry Bridge - a cantilever bridge in Chester, Pennsylvania
Keystone State, Pennsylvania, PA - a Mid-Atlantic state; one of the original 13 colonies
References in classic literature ?
"Now, Jo dear, the Chesters consider themselves very elegant people, so I want you to put on your best deportment.
"I hate to be patronized, and the Chesters think it's a great favor to allow us to help with their highly connected fair.
Those who had seen Edgar Caswall familiarly since his arrival, and had already estimated his cold-blooded nature at something of its true value, were surprised that he took so to heart the death of old Chester. The fact was that not one of them had guessed correctly at his character.
She made the first use of the opportunity the day after old Chester's death; indeed, as soon as the news had filtered in through the back door of Diana's Grove.
If he objects to come you may tell him it's Mr Chester. He will remember my name, I dare say.'
'Come hither, lad,' said Mr Chester. 'You know Mr Geoffrey Haredale?'
It was impossible that this could be the same Chester Johnson.
Chester Ross from Spencervale came here that morning.
Chester, will you come with me and see what they are doing?
"Which it seems to me you have no right to be, if you are in earnest," struck in Chester, who had been watching the scene in silence by Sir Charles's side.
The Duke of Chester, the vice-president, was a young and rising politician.
"Oh, I don't know," said the Duke of Chester, who was an optimist, "it's jolly good for some things.