chi-square test

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chi-square test

n.
A test that uses the chi-square statistic to test the fit between a theoretical frequency distribution and a frequency distribution of observed data for which each observation may fall into one of several classes.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

chi-square test

n
(Statistics) statistics a test derived from the chi-square distribution to compare the goodness of fit of theoretical and observed frequency distributions or to compare nominal data derived from unmatched groups of subjects
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

chi′-square`

(or chi′-squared`) test`,


n.
a test that uses the quantity chi-square for testing the mathematical fit of a frequency curve to an observed frequency distribution.
[1935–40]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Therefore, we adopted the hypothesis tests to detect probability distribution differences in the Z-test (1) and chi-squared test (2 and 3) to analyze the probability expected distribution and the observed probability in accordance with Benford's Law, according to the following equations:
CES-D symptom scores were expressed as discrete categories, and subsequent analysis was conducted using Chi-squared test.1 The CES-D scale, developed by Radloff, et al, is designed to be computed as a numerical score, to estimate the degree of depressive symptomatology in a respondent.2 An incorrect application of this scale therefore predisposes to questionable interpretation of results, when expressed in a Chi-squared table.1 It would have been more appropriate for the authors to compute a numerical score and apply a pre-validated cut-off score for depressive and non-depressive patients, as has been done in similar studies.3,4 Subsequent analysis may have been performed using parametric or non-parametric tests of independence, as appropriate.
From the results of Pearson Chi-squared test, it can be interpreted that the factors significantly affecting the occurrence of surgical site infections are alkaline phosphate levels above 150 IU/L, body mass index less than 17.5, WBC count more than 10000, presence of ascites, serum urea levels higher than 40 mg/dL, presence of diabetes mellitus, amount of bilirubin more than 10 mg/dL and ALT levels more than 100 IU/L.
The Fisher's exact chi-squared test and Yates-corrected chi-squared test were used to determine significant differences in chewing sensitivity among groups.
The differences in the variables were determined by the Chi-Squared test and Fisher's exact test between classic and preperitoneal methods.
The table above shows the results related to chi-squared test that determines existence of relationship or lack of relationship between the two variables of having or not having internet and type of political culture.
Distribution of samples within each aPKC staining category was analyzed by Chi-squared test.
The chi-squared test for trend revealed a highly significant increase in ceftriaxone resistance in KP between 2005 and 2010 (16-62%, p<0.0001) and a borderline increase in Enterobacter spp.
A chi-squared test is used to compare the predicted numbers with the actual numbers and this test suggests the model is not reliable.
- Chi-squared test: now the software indicates whether the scorecard variable has passed the chi-squared test or not
A similar situation occurs with the chi-squared test. My friend suggested I look at the Analysis of Means.
Consultant Stewart makes sure those with limited exposure to statistics get a lot of practice here and includes answers to his exercises as he covers population and samples, random sampling, presenting data, frequencies, percentages, proportions, rates, types of data, mean, median, mode, centiles, standard deviation, standard error, normal distribution, confidence intervals, probability, hypothesis tests and P-values, the t-test, parametric and non-parametric tests, correlation and regression, the chi-squared test and topics related directly to epidemiology such as measuring association, measuring disease frequency, using case-control and cohort studies and performing randomized controlled trials.