Chiang Ching-kuo


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Chiang Ching-kuo

(ˈtʃæŋ tʃɪŋˈkwəʊ) or

Jiang Jing Guo

n
(Biography) 1910–88, Chinese statesman; the son of Chiang Kai-shek. He was prime minister of Taiwan (1971–78); president (1978–88)
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Paying tribute to former President Chiang Ching-kuo and former Premier Sun Yun-suan, Gou stressed the island should take the path of 'industrial diplomacy.' Taiwan boasts strong manufacturing prowess and should look for opportunities around the world, he said.
However, the offer was rebuffed by Taiwan's then-president Chiang Ching-kuo, who in April that year came out with a "three nos" policy of no contact, no compromise and no negotiation with China.
Over 40 years ago, when Taiwan was a third world country with little over $100 per capita, then President Chiang Ching-kuo (son of the founder of modern Taiwan, Chiang Kai Sek) implemented what was then called the Ten Major Construction Projects, laying the foundations that helped Taiwan transform into an export-driven economy.
Conceptions of Chinese Democracy: Reading Sun Yat-Sen, Chiang Kai-Shek, and Chiang Ching-Kuo is recommended for political science and international studies students at the college level who seek an introduction to the thoughts of three influential men who created modern Taiwan.
Conceptions of Chinese democracy; reading Sun Yat-Sen, Chiang Kai-Shek and Chiang Ching-Kuo.
Here, the CWIHP's relative inattention to archives in Taiwan feels like a weakness, because although communications with PRC ambassador James Shen and opinions from Jiang Jieshi (Chiang Kai-shek) and his son Jiang Jingguo (Chiang Ching-kuo) make occasional appearances, they play far less of a role in the story than one might expect.
The minority had imposed its one-party will in 1949--first under exiled anti-communist leader Chiang Kai-shek and after his death, under his son, Chiang Ching-kuo.
Upon his return to Taiwan, he was quickly noticed by the nationalist party, Kuomintang (KMT), which allowed him to progress gradually into its higher ranks until Chiang Ching-kuo, the son of Chiang Kai-shek, made him his vice president, a radical move in this mainland China-dominated government.
Chiang Kai-shek's son, Chiang Ching-kuo (1910-88), carried out the political reforms that will also be the template for China's political modernization.
In 1987, President Chiang Ching-kuo, Generalissimo Chiang Kai-shek's son, lifted the martial law imposed by his father, marking the starting point of Taiwan's democratization.
In rare cases, hereditary dictatorships transition to democracy, as in the case of Taiwan under Chiang Ching-kuo, the son of dictator Chiang Kai-shek.
The near-absolute power of Chiang and his son Chiang Ching-kuo gave way to gradual democratization, with the ROC holding its first direct election for president in 1996 amid a growing sense of Taiwanese identity.