Marx Brothers

(redirected from Chico Marx)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Marx Brothers

(mɑːks)
n
(Biography) the. a US family of film comedians, esp Arthur Marx, known as Harpo (1888–1964), Herbert Marx, known as Zeppo (1901–79), Julius Marx, known as Groucho (1890–1977), and Leonard Marx, known as Chico (1886–1961). Their films include Animal Crackers (1930), Monkey Business (1931), Horsefeathers (1932), Duck Soup (1933), and A Day at the Races (1937)
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Marx Brothers - a family of United States comedians consisting of four brothers with an anarchic sense of humorMarx Brothers - a family of United States comedians consisting of four brothers with an anarchic sense of humor
Groucho, Julius Marx, Marx - United States comedian; one of four brothers who made motion pictures together (1890-1977)
Chico, Leonard Marx, Marx - United States comedian; one of four brothers who made motion pictures together (1891-1961)
Arthur Marx, Harpo, Marx - United States comedian; one of four brothers who made motion pictures together (1893-1964)
Herbert Marx, Marx, Zeppo - United States comedian; one of four brothers who made motion pictures together (1901-1979)
References in periodicals archive ?
pregunta Chico Marx, que interpreta a Chicolini --quien a su vez se hace pasar por Rufus T.
That's how Chico Marx when much he'd lost life to gambling " A shower or two today would see favourite Limato withdrawn from the race, which is a shame because I fancy he is well worth taking on at the price which would certainly be short.
Described by the Los Angeles Times as "an unholy Chico Marx, Vladimir Horowitz and Jerry Lewis mash-up", Joo mixes rib-tickling original songs with classical favourites.
The '50s were a boom time for Stennett, by then a solo comedian using his guitar and trumpet in an act that saw him teamed with some of America's biggest stars who came to Britain - including Johnny Ray, Chico Marx and James Cagney.
Throw in an anecdote about Chico Marx propositioning Tallulah Bankhead (punch line: "And so you shall, you old-fashioned boy"), George Burns insulting Jack Benny, a young Cavett seeing Bob Hope perform, Frank Sinatra refusing to croon "Springtime for Hitler," and you'll dine out on the stories for weeks.
Chico Marx once famously asked, "Who you gonna believe, me or your own eyes?
As the great Chico Marx once said, come January, there ain't no sanity clause.
In a classic scene in A Day at the Races (1937), Chico Marx fleeces Groucho by showing him a library of books ostensibly filled with racing tips and then puts the money on Sun-up, a horse that "wins all the time" but "just because he comes in first.
CHICO Marx explained to his wife what he was doing when she caught him with another woman by saying: "I wasn't kissing her, I was whispering in her mouth.
Virginia Davidson invokes the intertwined connectedness of Siamese twins to explore how to help writers with the concept of audience, and Derek Boczkowski recalls a scene in which Groucho and Chico Marx duel over entry into a speakeasy, offering it as a frame for tutors' struggles with how much to inform students.