Chindit


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Chindit

(ˈtʃɪndɪt)
n
1. (Military) a member of the Allied forces commanded by Orde Wingate fighting behind the Japanese lines in Burma (1943–45)
2. (Historical Terms) a member of the Allied forces commanded by Orde Wingate fighting behind the Japanese lines in Burma (1943–45)
[C20: from Burmese chinthé a fabulous lion a symbol of which was their badge; adoption of title perhaps influenced by Chindwin]
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References in periodicals archive ?
Pubs from all over the city are participating in the scheme, including the Giffard Arms, the Duke of York, the Prince Albert, the Plough and Harrow, the Chindit, the Bruford Arms and the Pendulum.
The book details their actions and their methods in operations, such as the Chindit Expeditions and Operation Thursday, and explains the reasons for their successes and failures.
THE SILENT CHINDIT ALMA Moore, from Lancashire, remembers watching the Calling Blighty film when she was a small child and spotting her father, Private Frank Miller, on-screen.
As a Chindit, I was part of an infantry column, let's just say that I carried a weapon and fired it a few times."
During service in India he was part of the Chindit force that served behind the Japanese lines.
A copy of his report of the first Chindit operation went to a friend of Churchill, who brought it to the great man's attention.
Around 120 soldiers from the 2nd Battalion The Rifles and Chindit Company from the 2nd Battalion The Duke of Lancaster's Regiment took part.
The video claims to have been made by the Chindit Company of soldiers, from within the Duke of Lancaster's Regiment.
On the other side of the world, the 1st Air Commando Group transported and supplied the British "Chindit" raiding force and the US unit known as "Merrill's Marauders." All of these units disbanded after the war, and not until 1951 did air resupply and communications units form to conduct psychological operations and agent-infiltration missions during the Korean War.
Major General Orde Wingate, a commander of the "Chindit Special Force" (and a British military innovator) pioneered a brutal training regimen that quickly shaped soft, poor-quality infantry into a cohesive counterinsurgency-capable force.
In Fire in the Night: Wingate of Burma, Ethiopia, and Zion, John Bierman and Colin Smith assess the role of Major General Orde Wingate, daring leader of the Chindit special force operations, and his battle behind Japanese lines.