Chindwin


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Chin·dwin

 (chĭn′dwĭn′)
A river rising in the hills of northern Myanmar (Burma) and flowing about 1,160 km (720 mi) generally south to the Irrawaddy River.

Chindwin

(ˈtʃɪnˈdwɪn)
n
(Placename) a river in N Myanmar, rising in the Kumôn Range and flowing northwest then south to the Irrawaddy, of which it is the main tributary. Length: about 966 km (600 miles)

Chin•dwin

(ˈtʃɪnˈdwɪn)

n.
a river in N Burma, flowing S to the Irrawaddy River. 550 mi. (885 km) long.
References in periodicals archive ?
To visit this festival, one has to travel from Kalewa from that point we need to sail upstream in Chindwin River via Homemalin to reach Htamanthi.
Four towns along the Ayeyarwady and Chindwin rivers were in danger of being inundated as the rivers rose, the Department of Disaster Management said.
Likewise, students from Chindwin College, Myanmar, have the chance to pursue courses with PSB Academy in Singapore, upon completing relevant programmes in their home country.
The two outlets are depicted differently on different maps, and give rise variously to the Brahmaputra, Kaladan, Meghna, Irrawaddy, Chindwin, Chao Phraya, and Salween rivers.
Rainforest Cruises has released details on new river cruise itineraries that span six to 11 days and navigate the Irrawaddy and Chindwin Rivers.
As we approached Pungro, I watched the beautiful Zinki River flowing gently and then disappearing across a bend as it made its way to the Chindwin River in Myanmar.
With the decline of Buddhism deep in Ledi's mind, he left his cave on the banks of the Chindwin river for a life of "nearly ceaseless travel" (77).
That changed this fall when a budding armada of ships took to the river and its tributary the Chindwin River.
In February 1943, he led some 3,000 British and Empire troops (including Gurkhas, West Africans, and Indian units) across the Chindwin River.
In 2008, India's National Hydroelectric Power Corporation (NHPC) and the Myanmar Department of Hydropower Implementation (DHPI) signed an agreement for the joint development of two dams on the Chindwin river in Western Sagaing Region at Tamanthi and Shwezaye with a planned electrical generation capacity of 1,200 MW and 600 MW respectively, with 80 per cent of the electricity to be routed to Manipur.
It was becoming a uniting organization among the Kuki people in Lakhipur (now a city in Assam), Tripura (the third smallest state in the country of India, now dominated by migrants), Chittagong Hill Tracts (now in Bangladesh), and Upper Chindwin and Upper Burma (now in Myanmar).