Chinese whispers


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Chinese whispers

n (functioning as singular)
1. (Games, other than specified) a game in which a message is passed on, in a whisper, by each of a number of people, so that the final version of the message is often radically changed from the original
2. any situation where information is passed on in turn by a number of people, often becoming distorted in the process
Translations
téléphone arabe
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References in periodicals archive ?
Mouswald woman Ann Hill, who is Quilter in Residence at Alzheimer Scotland for which she has raised almost PS100,000, spearheaded the international scheme which works like the old children's game of Chinese whispers.
A spokesman for British Transport Police said what came next was a "severe case of Chinese whispers" as reports started spreading through rush-hour trains that there had been a shooting.
The Beckham camp were said to be furious that she'd repeated the rumours in public, but Katherine now says it was the only way to stop the "Chinese whispers".
A spokesman for David, 43, said the gossip was "a crock of s***", adding: "It's embarrassing and laughable." A friend of the couple said that many of the rumours on Twitter were "ridiculous" and the result of "Chinese whispers".
'It is like Chinese Whispers' she said, 'In the morning a child will fall down and scrape their knee and after hundreds of messages are sent and exchanged, by the end of the day the poor child is dead!'
The Chinese whispers about a Toon takeover may have subsided.
"It's a new Chinese whispers that got completely out of control and ultimately I've come off Twitter purely because of that."
CHINESE whispers are circulating about Sony's rumoured PS4 upgrade, with a new leak claiming it's been codenamed NEO.
Historical and natural events were then communicated by "word of mouth", and over many generations - "Chinese whispers".
Jennifer Lawrence hosts this year's "Chinese Whispers" themed gala to celebrate the opening of the "China: Through the Looking Glass" exhibition.
The story of language in Europe, Dorren tells us, is like a game of Chinese whispers: once upon a time there was a single tongue--its name, if it ever had one, is long forgotten, but linguists refer to it as PIE (Proto-Indo-European).
But Delhi and Twitters' insatiable appetite for the inside story cannot be quenched quite so easily, it was a matter of time before Chinese whispers became the preferred form of communication.