fortune cookie

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fortune cookie

n.
A cookie made from a thin layer of dough that is folded and baked around a slip of paper bearing a prediction of fortune or a maxim.

for′tune cook`ie


n.
a folded edible wafer containing a slip of paper with a printed maxim or prediction.
[1960–65]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.fortune cookie - thin folded wafer containing a maxim on a slip of paperfortune cookie - thin folded wafer containing a maxim on a slip of paper
cookie, cooky, biscuit - any of various small flat sweet cakes (`biscuit' is the British term)
Cathay, China, Communist China, mainland China, People's Republic of China, PRC, Red China - a communist nation that covers a vast territory in eastern Asia; the most populous country in the world
Translations
Glückskeks
References in periodicals archive ?
DESPITE GOVERNMENT efforts to quash concerns of a Cyprus debt haircut, yesterday's mixed messages coming from international players who now hold the fate of the island's economy in their hands made any predictions on Cyprus' future as valuable as a Chinese fortune cookie. Yesterday's comments on a potential haircut from representatives of the European Central Bank (ECB), International Monetary Fund (IMF), Eurogroup, Germany and Russia would have left most analysts scratching their heads as to what exactly is the troika's plan for Cyprus.
They were invented by London baker and confectioner Tom Smith in Clerkenwell, East London, who copied the Chinese fortune cookie by wrapping his sweets with a motto in waxed paper.
He then recalled a line from a Chinese fortune cookie he saw recently that seemingly foretold his retirement.
"The Chinese Fortune Cookie" is a novel about young tween Ramblin' Rose who looks up to her grandfather as the ultimate source of wisdom.
Yanhong Bi, programme manager of the Sino-Anglo Cultural Exchange Association, said: "The Chinese fortune cookie is recognised as a mystical way of telling the future.
For as Curtis, the man who stunned the sporting world when he won The Open in his first professional major last year, munched into a Chinese fortune cookie there slipped out a message which read: `You will receive a visit from an old friend.
I opened a Chinese fortune cookie that had a saying in it that was right on, 'the time we give to our friends is the best time spent.' That is a lot of what TAPPI is about ..."