Chinese pear


Also found in: Wikipedia.
Related to Chinese pear: Japanese pear, Chinese Apple

Chinese pear

Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
From behind the clean-lined counter, Gabriel Ouehen, former head bartender at one of the city's top cocktail bars, Hotel Particulier Montmartre, whips up house specials like the Asian Mule, which is a mix of lemongrass-infused vodka and yuzu liqueur, and the Coronashi, an imaginative mashup of rum, soursop nectar, apple wood, and Chinese pear, served with the smoke of dry ice emitting from its eyeball-shaped glass.
Potential beauty." He features over two acres of products to serve the seasonal needs of gardeners, including tomato plants, Chinese pear trees, fig trees, lemongrass herbs, and assorted perennials.
Wuyun et al., "Molecular identification of two new self-incompatible alleles (S-alleles) in Chinese pear (Pyrus bretschneideri)," Journal of Plant Physiology and Molecular Biology, vol.
Li, "Identification and sequence analysis of new SFBB-gamma of Chinese pear," Journal of Central South University of Technology, vol.
Chinese pears were considered to be the major origin of Asian pears [9].
The Asian pear (Pyrus pyrifolia) is known by many names such as apple-pear, Chinese pear, Nashi and sand pear.
Pyrus calleryana "Chanticleer" is a gorgeous deciduous tree, commonly known as the Chinese pear. It has a distinct, almost conical shape and, before the leaves open, is covered with numerous heads of tiny white flowers.
While pearwood is the common term for commercial and veneer, especially in the United States, other names include: wild pear and choke pear, alligator pear, dogwood pear, Chinese pear, white pear, Nigerian pear, elsbeere, and "native" pear, which grows in western Australia.
Japanese and Chinese pears, also called Oriental pears, are descendants of the wild sand pear of China.
The RARC also offers a variety of winter fruits like Chinese pears, plums, peaches, nectarines, and strawberries.
There is always an abundance of fresh fruit and vegetables in the farm shop ranging from the everyday lettuce, tomatoes, carrots and potatoes to the more unusual Romanesque cauliflower, celeriac, Jerusalem artichokes, Chinese pears and star fruit, to name but a few.
For example, how Central American countries have dealt with the risk of mad cow disease, Madagascar with African swine fever, Australia with Chinese pears, the United States with salmonella in eggs -- these and other topics were discussed at a recent WTO workshop.

Full browser ?