Chinook Jargon

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Related to Chinuk Wawa: Chinook Jargon, Chinook Wawa

Chinook Jargon

n.
A pidgin language combining words from Nootka, Chinook, Salishan languages, French, and English, formerly used as a lingua franca in the Pacific Northwest.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Chinook Jargon

n
(Languages) a pidgin language containing elements of Native American languages, English, and French: formerly used among fur traders and Indians on the NW coast of North America
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Chinook′ Jar′gon


n.
a pidgin based largely on Nootka, Lower Chinook, French, and English, once widely used as a lingua franca from Alaska to Oregon.
[1830–40]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Chinook Jargon - a pidgin incorporating Chinook and French and English words; formerly used as a lingua franca in northwestern North America
pidgin - an artificial language used for trade between speakers of different languages
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Among their chapters are linguistic diversity in Oregon and Washington, reviving Chinook Jargon: the Chinuk Wawa Language Program of the Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde in Oregon, indigenous language revitalization in Puyallup Territory, Seattle to Spokane: what what Washingtonians think about English spoken in their state, and what Oregon English can reveal about dialect diversity in the Pacific Northwest.
Anti-Objects, or Space Without Path or Boundary (2016) surveys two architectural structures: the Cathlapotle Plankhouse in Ridgefield, Washington, a cultural center named for the Chinookan town that once existed there, and the Tilikum Crossing, a cable-stayed bridge in Portland, Oregon, that takes its name from the word for "people" in Chinuk Wawa, the Chinookan creole.
Also new are a sketch of Chinuk Wawa grammar; etymological notes on the origins of words; and a supplementary vocabulary of words, expressions, and meanings that are known from other parts of the greater lower Columbia River region but have not been passed down from Grand Ronde elders.
A woman of the gitlaqimas/Clackamas Nation later said in Chinuk Wawa, "Tahtlum tokamonuk ahnkuty, halo Boston man nannich, ocoke illiahee pe halo siwash nannich, saghaleepiah, washona, chahcotyee, Clackamas siwash, hyas Tillicum, ahncutty caqua Multnomah" She explained that a thousand years earlier the gitlaqimas and malnumax were one great nation.
Once Underriner comes on board in January, the college will work with the Confederated Tribes of the Grand Ronde to offer a four-hour course in Chinuk Wawa, a trade language used among native Northwest tribes.