Chippewa


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Chip·pe·wa

 (chĭp′ə-wô′, -wä′, -wā′, -wə)
n. pl. Chippewa or Chip·pe·was
See Ojibwa.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Chippewa

(ˈtʃɪpɪˌwɑː) or

Chippeway

n, pl -was, -wa, -ways or -way
1. (Peoples) another name for Ojibwa
2. (Languages) another name for Ojibwa
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Chip•pe•wa

(ˈtʃɪp əˌwɑ, -ˌweɪ, -wə)

n., pl. -was, (esp. collectively) -wa.
the Ojibwa, esp. Ojibwas of the U.S.
[1665–75, Amer.]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Chippewa - a member of an Algonquian people who lived west of Lake SuperiorChippewa - a member of an Algonquian people who lived west of Lake Superior
Algonquian, Algonquin - a member of any of the North American Indian groups speaking an Algonquian language and originally living in the subarctic regions of eastern Canada; many Algonquian tribes migrated south into the woodlands from the Mississippi River to the Atlantic coast
Buffalo Indian, Plains Indian - a member of one of the tribes of American Indians who lived a nomadic life following the buffalo in the Great Plains of North America
2.Chippewa - the Algonquian language spoken by the Ojibwa
Algonquian language, Algonquin, Algonquian - family of North American Indian languages spoken from Labrador to South Carolina and west to the Great Plains
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in classic literature ?
{Highlands = the Hudson Highlands, a mountainous region in Putnam and Dutchess Counties, through which the Hudson River passes in a deep and picturesque gorge; Eolus = God of the winds; Boreas = God of the North wind; Seneca = one of the Finger Lakes in central New York State; Grecian king = both the Senecas of antiquity, the rhetorician (54 BC-39 AD) and his son the philosopher/statesman (4 BC-65 AD), were, of course, Romans--in any case, Lake Seneca is named after the Seneca nation of the Iroquois Indians; Park-Place = already in 1816 a fashionable street in lower Manhattan; Chippewa = an American army defeated the British at Chippewa, in Canada near Niagara Falls, on July 5, 1814; Lawrence = Captain James ("Don't give up the ship!") Lawrence (1781-
a Chippewa has come hither with the name of a Huron' Brothers, we must not forget the dead; a red-skin never ceases to remember.
He who was called by that name is forgotten; his blood was pale, and it came not from the veins of a Huron; the wicked Chippewas cheated my squaw.
What I saw in him -- as evidently as the indestructible ramparts of Old Ticonderoga, already cited as the most appropriate simile -- was the features of stubborn and ponderous endurance, which might well have amounted to obstinacy in his earlier days; of integrity, that, like most of his other endowments, lay in a somewhat heavy mass, and was just as unmalleable or unmanageable as a ton of iron ore; and of benevolence which, fiercely as he led the bayonets on at Chippewa or Fort Erie, I take to be of quite as genuine a stamp as what actuates any or all the polemical philanthropists of the age.
(23.) "Treaty with the Chippewa, September 30, 1854," reprinted by the Great Lakes Indian Fish and Wildlife Commission in A Guide to Understanding Chippewa Treaty Rights (Odanah, Wisconsin: GLIFWC publication, 1994), 35.
And members of the tiny Sokaogon Chippewa Indian reservation (contained entirely within the town of Nashville) believe their wild-rice crop and spiritual home would be ruined by the shaft mine.
Hugging the Chippewa River some 130 miles southeast of Michigan's Sleeping Bear Dunes, a tree farm sprawls across the plains.
Principal battles: Ogdensburg (1812); Sacket's Harbor, Montreal (1813); Chippewa, Lundy's Lane, Fort Erie (all in Ontario, near Niagara Falls) (1814).
He married the granddaughter of a Chippewa chieftain and from her gathered much Indian lore.
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