Ojibwa

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O·jib·wa

 (ō-jĭb′wā′, -wə) also O·jib·way (-wā′) or O·jib·we (-wĕ)
n. pl. Ojibwa or O·jib·was also Ojibway or O·jib·ways or Ojibwe or O·jib·wes
1. A member of a Native American people originally located north of Lake Huron before moving westward in the 1600s and 1700s into Michigan, Wisconsin, Minnesota, western Ontario, and Manitoba, with later migrations onto the northern Great Plains in North Dakota, Montana, and Saskatchewan.
2. The Algonquian language of the Ojibwa. In both senses also called Chippewa.

[Ojibwa ojibwe.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Ojibwa

(əʊˈdʒɪbwə)
npl -was or -wa
1. (Peoples) a member of a North American Indian people living in a region west of Lake Superior
2. (Languages) the language of this people, belonging to the Algonquian family
Also: Chippewa
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

O•jib•wa

(oʊˈdʒɪb weɪ, -wə)

also O•jib•way

(-weɪ)

n., pl. -was also -ways, (esp. collectively) -wa also -way.
1. a member of an American Indian people of Canada and the U.S., living principally in a region around Lakes Huron and Superior, extending W and N of Lake Superior to Saskatchewan and N Ontario.
2. the Algonquian language shared by the Ojibwa, Ottawa, and Algonquins.
[1690–1700]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Ojibwa - a member of an Algonquian people who lived west of Lake SuperiorOjibwa - a member of an Algonquian people who lived west of Lake Superior
Algonquian, Algonquin - a member of any of the North American Indian groups speaking an Algonquian language and originally living in the subarctic regions of eastern Canada; many Algonquian tribes migrated south into the woodlands from the Mississippi River to the Atlantic coast
Buffalo Indian, Plains Indian - a member of one of the tribes of American Indians who lived a nomadic life following the buffalo in the Great Plains of North America
2.Ojibwa - the Algonquian language spoken by the Ojibwa
Algonquian language, Algonquin, Algonquian - family of North American Indian languages spoken from Labrador to South Carolina and west to the Great Plains
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
This court denied their motion to dismiss after finding that neither entity is an arm of the tribe known as the Lac Vieux Desert Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians. The defendants' appeal of that decision is now pending before the Fourth Circuit.
His lifelong interest in Native American cultures also started at an early age, inspired by encounters with Chippewa Indians living near his hometown, Saginaw, Michigan.
Before the clinic was completed in 2016, people in the area had to drive 100 miles to get medical treatment, noted Jim Williams, chief of the Lac Vieux Desert Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians.
The Leech Lake Band of Ojibwe will receive a total of $1,921,228, the Lower Sioux Indian Community will receive a total of $3,261,780, the Mille Lacs Band of Ojibwe will receive a total of $1,187,669, the Red Lake Band of Chippewa Indians will receive a total of $1,310,299, the Prairie Island Indian Community will receive a total of $598,976, and the White Earth Reservation Tribal Council will receive a total of $337,426.
The International Powwow continues this custom every September, highlighting native traditions in dancing, drumming, singing, and arts and crafts from area tribes such as the Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa Indians, Standing Rock Dakota-Lakota, Yavapai-Apache Nation and Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate.
This year's common reading is "The Round House" by Louise Erdrich, a member of the Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa Indians in North Dakota.
In 1887, Harbor Springs resident Andrew Blackbird published his "History of the Ottawa and Chippewa Indians of Michigan." Blackbird was an Odawa tribal leader, and his book was one of the first authoritative accounts of these Native-American groups.
The three tribal communities that participated were the Bad River Band of Lake Superior Tribe of Chippewa Indians in Wisconsin, the Fond du Lac Reservation in Minnesota, and the Detroit Urban Indian Community in Michigan.
M2 EQUITYBITES-January 28, 2016-Lac Vieux Desert Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians Buys Bellicose Capital
Buyer: Lac Vieux Desert Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians

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