Ojibwa

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Related to Chippewa Nation: Chippewa Indians, Ojibwas

O·jib·wa

 (ō-jĭb′wā′, -wə) also O·jib·way (-wā′) or O·jib·we (-wĕ)
n. pl. Ojibwa or O·jib·was also Ojibway or O·jib·ways or Ojibwe or O·jib·wes
1. A member of a Native American people originally located north of Lake Huron before moving westward in the 1600s and 1700s into Michigan, Wisconsin, Minnesota, western Ontario, and Manitoba, with later migrations onto the northern Great Plains in North Dakota, Montana, and Saskatchewan.
2. The Algonquian language of the Ojibwa. In both senses also called Chippewa.

[Ojibwa ojibwe.]

Ojibwa

(əʊˈdʒɪbwə)
npl -was or -wa
1. (Peoples) a member of a North American Indian people living in a region west of Lake Superior
2. (Languages) the language of this people, belonging to the Algonquian family
Also: Chippewa

O•jib•wa

(oʊˈdʒɪb weɪ, -wə)

also O•jib•way

(-weɪ)

n., pl. -was also -ways, (esp. collectively) -wa also -way.
1. a member of an American Indian people of Canada and the U.S., living principally in a region around Lakes Huron and Superior, extending W and N of Lake Superior to Saskatchewan and N Ontario.
2. the Algonquian language shared by the Ojibwa, Ottawa, and Algonquins.
[1690–1700]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Ojibwa - a member of an Algonquian people who lived west of Lake SuperiorOjibwa - a member of an Algonquian people who lived west of Lake Superior
Algonquian, Algonquin - a member of any of the North American Indian groups speaking an Algonquian language and originally living in the subarctic regions of eastern Canada; many Algonquian tribes migrated south into the woodlands from the Mississippi River to the Atlantic coast
Buffalo Indian, Plains Indian - a member of one of the tribes of American Indians who lived a nomadic life following the buffalo in the Great Plains of North America
2.Ojibwa - the Algonquian language spoken by the Ojibwa
Algonquian language, Algonquin, Algonquian - family of North American Indian languages spoken from Labrador to South Carolina and west to the Great Plains
References in periodicals archive ?
He was constantly laughing and wears antique clothes - a black bearskin cap trimmed in porcupine quills, red plush pants, green stockings and Chippewa nation moccasins
His father was of German-American descent, while his mother was a member of the Chippewa nation.
You will remember me as Fred Plain, a hereditary chief of the Chippewa Nation at Sarnia, Ont.

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