chitterlings

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chit·ter·lings

also chit·lins or chit·lings  (chĭt′lĭnz)
pl.n.
The small intestines of pigs, especially when cooked and eaten as food.

[From Middle English chiterling, probably diminutive of Old English *cieter, intestines.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

chitterlings

(ˈtʃɪtəlɪŋz) ,

chitlins

or

chitlings

pl n
(Cookery) (sometimes singular) the intestines of a pig or other animal prepared as a dish. Also called: chitlin
[C13: of uncertain origin; perhaps related to Middle High German kutel]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

chit•ter•lings

or

chit•lings

(ˈtʃɪt lɪnz, -lɪŋz)

n. (used with a sing. or pl. v.)
the small intestine of swine, esp. when prepared as food.
[1250–1300; Middle English cheterling; akin to German Kutteln in same sense]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

Chitlins

Fried hog intestines.
1001 Words and Phrases You Never Knew You Didn’t Know by W.R. Runyan Copyright © 2011 by W.R. Runyan
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.chitterlings - small intestines of hogs prepared as food
organs, variety meat - edible viscera of a butchered animal
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Despite these structural issues, Bell had a steady stream of customers during those months--especially during the holidays--who would come in to warm up with a variety of his menu items, including smothered pork chops, macaroni and cheese, and chit'lins, as well as a multitude of other comfort foods.
Dishes like Hoppin' John, candied yams, chit'lins (chitterlings), and sweet potato pie are American classics that were born out of necessity, often from the scraps of the main house table supplemented by meager gardens and what could be hunted or fished.
The men did the butchering, the women took care of the organs and scraps to make chit'lins and sausage, and the children tried not to get in the way.