choliambic


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choliambic

(ˌkəʊlɪˈæmbɪk)
adj
relating to or in the form of choliambs
References in classic literature ?
1776, a Dissertation on Babrias, and a collection of his fables in choliambic meter found in a MS.
Catullus 8 is written in the choliambic meter, sometimes also called 'limping iambics', or scazons.
Fantuzzi & Hunter 2004:8-9, who add: 'In so doing, Callimachus' Hipponax not only reveals, with a keen sense of history, that he knows that invective poetry was closely linked to the specific context where it was produced (the culture of archaic Ionia), but he also reflects, within the scope of his new poetic programme (and that of Callimachus), a sense of the progressive elimination of personal polemic, which had marked the evolution of comic and satirical literature from iambic poetry to Middle and New Comedy', and further on (10-11), elements of 'the true iambiko~ character--aggressive, bantering, admonitory--expressed in the Ionic dialect' and in choliambic and iambic metres maintain the connection with Hipponax in Iambi 1-5 and 13.
His fables are for the most part versions of the stock stories associated with the name of Aesop; however, Babrius rendered them into the scazon, or choliambic, meter.
It is in keeping with the same spirit of late sixth-century experimentation and variation that Hipponax conceived the idea of altering the trimeter's verse end and created the choliambic meter.
Greek poet, probably of the Aegean island of Cos, and the author of short dramatic scenes in choliambic verse of a world of low life similar to that portrayed in the New Comedy.
The vast majority of the poems are in elegiac couplets, with one in choliambics and one in hendecasyl-labics in the Xenia, and nine in hendecasyllabics in the Apophoreta.
The six satires, amounting to 650 lines, are in hexameters, but what appears as a prologue, in which Persius (an extremely wealthy man) ironically asserts that he writes to earn his bread, not because he is inspired, is in choliambics.