chorda

(redirected from Chorda tympani)
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chorda

(ˈkɔːdə)
n
a cord-like formation in the body
References in periodicals archive ?
We conducted a study to assess the use of the chorda tympani nerve in reconstruction of the ossicular chain.
To elucidate the neural mechanisms of such age-related changes in taste preference and sensitivity, electrophysiological experiments examined taste response characteristics of chorda tympani nerves.
To explain the findings, lead researcher Linda Bartoshuk says repeated ear infections might permanently damage a nerve called the chorda tympani.
After a complete intact-canal-wall tympanomastoidectomy, the mass was seen to extend inferiorly; it involved the chorda tympani, but it did not extend any farther into the mastoid than the antrum.
In younger rats, injury to the chorda tympani nerve, which innervates the front of the tongue, typically prompts an infusion of immune cells called neutrophils to the injury site as well as surrounding tissue.
This study was undertaken to assess dysgeusia in patients who have undergone middle ear surgery for chronic suppurative otitis media (CSOM) when the surgeon's practice was to cleanly divide the chorda tympani without prior manipulation, if it in any way hindered operative access or the aims of surgery.
Upon measuring nerve activity in the chorda tympani (CT), a branch of the facial nerve that serves the taste buds in the front of the tongue, the researchers found that activity in CT nerve fibres increased when nicotine was put on the mice's tongues.
The facial nerve gives off branches to the stapedius muscle and the chorda tympani prior to its extratemporal course.
To help further define this area, we used computer-aided design software to measure (I) the angle between the facial nerve and the chorda tympani nerve and (2) the distance between the takeoff point of the chorda tympani and the posteriormost prominent point of the short process of the incus in 30 cadaveric adult temporal bones.
The chorda tympani nerve was engulfed in disease and was sacrificed to aid in exposure and resection.
The smaller of the two pearls was located posterolateral to the annulus immediately behind the chorda tympani, and the larger pearl was situated more laterally in the ear canal.
The operation proceeded without incident (the chorda tympani nerve, the stapedial tendon, and both the anterior and posterior crura of the stapes were identified) until a facial nerve dehiscence was noted.