naevus

(redirected from Choroidal melanoma)
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naevus

or

nevus

n, pl -vi (-vaɪ)
(Medicine) any congenital growth or pigmented blemish on the skin; birthmark or mole. Also called: naeve
[C19: from Latin; related to (g)natus born, produced by nature]
ˈnaevoid, ˈnevoid adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
Translations

naevus

nevus (US) [ˈniːvəs] N (naevi, (US) nevi (pl)) [ˈniːvaɪ]nevo m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Schmid, "P53 oncoprotein overexpression in choroidal melanoma," Modern Pathology, vol.
Correlation of heterogeneity for chromosome 3 copy number with cell type in choroidal melanoma of mixed-cell type.
In January 2013, a 50-year-old Caucasian male patient underwent, without an adjunctive brachytherapy, endoresection of anteriorly located spindle cell choroidal melanoma. In December 2014, multiple pigmented scleral lesions were found on the same eye, with the outermost lesion located 5 mm away from the limbus.
The US Food and Drug Administration has granted AU-011 fast track designation for the treatment of primary ocular melanoma, also known as uveal or choroidal melanoma.
A week later, at his appointment in Liverpool, Matthew was told he had a cancer known as choroidal melanoma. A biopsy a few weeks later revealed his tumour was a particularly aggressive form of cancer that was likely to spread to other parts of his body and although he could receive some form of treatment, it could not be cured.
A week later, in Liverpool, Mr Parsons was told he had a cancer known as choroidal melanoma.
Inclusion criteria included the following: (1) diagnosis of choroidal melanoma, (2) minimum follow-up of 12 months, and (3) sufficient material for immunohistochemical analysis.
The evaluation of choroidal nevi can be a diagnostic challenge because in some cases a distinction between a benign nevus and a small choroidal melanoma is not readily apparent [12].
(14,15,18) In a third study, 53 patients underwent enucleation for ocular cancer, of whom 51 had choroidal melanoma. (17) Indeed, it is unclear as to whether these findings would hold for patients with uveal melanoma.
Tissue culture of human choroidal melanoma cells obtained by fine-needle aspiration biopsy.
The overall mortality resulting from intraocular choroidal melanoma has been reported as 35% in 5 years and 50% in 10 years.