Christendom


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Related to Christendom: Western Christendom

Chris·ten·dom

 (krĭs′ən-dəm)
n.
1. Christians considered as a group.
2. The portion of the world in which Christianity is the dominant religion.

[Middle English Cristendom, from Old English cristendōm : cristen, Christian; see Christian + -dōm, -dom.]

Christendom

(ˈkrɪsəndəm)
n
1. (Theology) the collective body of Christians throughout the world or throughout history
2. (Theology) an obsolete word for Christianity

Chris•ten•dom

(ˈkrɪs ən dəm)

n.
1. Christians collectively.
2. the Christian world.
[before 900]

Christendom

Christians collectively or the Christian world.
See also: Christianity

Christendom

 Christians collectively, 1131; A particular body or community of Christians, 1205.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Christendom - the collective body of Christians throughout the world and history (found predominantly in Europe and the Americas and Australia); "for a thousand years the Roman Catholic Church was the principal church of Christendom"
body - a group of persons associated by some common tie or occupation and regarded as an entity; "the whole body filed out of the auditorium"; "the student body"; "administrative body"
Christian church, church - one of the groups of Christians who have their own beliefs and forms of worship
church - the body of people who attend or belong to a particular local church; "our church is hosting a picnic next week"
Translations

Christendom

[ˈkrɪsndəm] Ncristiandad f

Christendom

[ˈkrɪsəndəm] n (old-fashioned)chrétienté f

Christendom

n (old)die Christenheit

Christendom

[ˈkrɪsndəm] ncristianità
References in classic literature ?
When a new-hatched savage running wild about his native woodlands in a grass clout, followed by the nibbling goats, as if he were a green sapling; even then, in Queequeg's ambitious soul, lurked a strong desire to see something more of Christendom than a specimen whaler or two.
There's not a magazine in Christendom that would dare to publish it - you know that.
I may say, in short, that I took part in that glorious expedition, promoted by this time to be a captain of infantry, to which honourable charge my good luck rather than my merits raised me; and that day- so fortunate for Christendom, because then all the nations of the earth were disabused of the error under which they lay in imagining the Turks to be invincible on sea-on that day, I say, on which the Ottoman pride and arrogance were broken, among all that were there made happy (for the Christians who died that day were happier than those who remained alive and victorious) I alone was miserable; for, instead of some naval crown that I might have expected had it been in Roman times, on the night that followed that famous day I found myself with fetters on my feet and manacles on my hands.
There is one, Francois Villet, at Cahors, who will send me wine-casks for my cloth-bales, so to Cahors I will go, though all the robber-knights of Christendom were to line the roads like yonder poplars.
The genial festival of Christmas, which throughout all Christendom lights up the fireside of home with mirth and jollity, followed hard upon the wedding just described.
What I saw their bravest and their fairest do last night, the lowest multitude that could be scraped up out of the purlieus of Christendom would blush to do, I think.
In short, Harris Collins, in the totality of results, was guilty of causing more misery and pain to animals than all laboratories of vivisection in Christendom.
Then the Cross, which for a thousand years and more had stood upon the ramparts of Christendom, went down before the Crescent.
But a housemaid out of a reformatory, with a plain face and a deformed shoulder, falling in love, at first sight, with a gentleman who comes on a visit to her mistress's house, match me that, in the way of an absurdity, out of any story-book in Christendom, if you can
To thine honour we refer the armour and household goods of the Order which we leave behind us, and on thy conscience we lay the scandal and offence thou hast this day given to Christendom.
Even down to my birth-century that poison was still in the blood of Christendom, and the best of English com- moners was still content to see his inferiors impudently continuing to hold a number of positions, such as lord- ships and the throne, to which the grotesque laws of his country did not allow him to aspire; in fact, he was not merely contented with this strange condition of things, he was even able to persuade himself that he was proud of it.
In obedience, therefore, to his honour's commands, I related to him the Revolution under the Prince of Orange; the long war with France, entered into by the said prince, and renewed by his successor, the present queen, wherein the greatest powers of Christendom were engaged, and which still continued: I computed, at his request, "that about a million of YAHOOS might have been killed in the whole progress of it; and perhaps a hundred or more cities taken, and five times as many ships burnt or sunk.