chronicle

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chronicle

chronological record of events; recount, relate, report
Not to be confused with:
chronical – having long duration, as of a disease: a chronical condition
Abused, Confused, & Misused Words by Mary Embree Copyright © 2007, 2013 by Mary Embree

chron·i·cle

 (krŏn′ĭ-kəl)
n.
1. An extended account in prose or verse of historical events, sometimes including legendary material, presented in chronological order and without authorial interpretation or comment.
2. A detailed narrative record or report.
3. Chronicles(used with a sing. verb) See Table at Bible.
tr.v. chron·i·cled, chron·i·cling, chron·i·cles
To record in or in the form of a historical record.

[Middle English cronicle, from Anglo-Norman, alteration of Old French cronique, from Latin chronica, from Greek khronika (biblia), chronological (books), annals, neuter pl. of khronikos, of time; see chronic.]

chron′i·cler (-klər) n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

chronicle

(ˈkrɒnɪkəl)
n
a record or register of events in chronological order
vb
(tr) to record in or as if in a chronicle
[C14: from Anglo-French cronicle, via Latin chronica (pl), from Greek khronika annals, from khronikos relating to time; see chronic]
ˈchronicler n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

chron•i•cle

(ˈkrɒn ɪ kəl)

n., v. -cled, -cling. n.
1. a chronological record of events; a history.
v.t.
2. to record in or as if in a chronicle.
[1275–1325; Middle English cronicle < Anglo-French, alter. of Old French cronique < Medieval Latin cronica (feminine singular), Latin chronica (neuter pl.) < Greek chroniká annals, chronology; see chronic]
chron′i•cler, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

chronicle


Past participle: chronicled
Gerund: chronicling

Imperative
chronicle
chronicle
Present
I chronicle
you chronicle
he/she/it chronicles
we chronicle
you chronicle
they chronicle
Preterite
I chronicled
you chronicled
he/she/it chronicled
we chronicled
you chronicled
they chronicled
Present Continuous
I am chronicling
you are chronicling
he/she/it is chronicling
we are chronicling
you are chronicling
they are chronicling
Present Perfect
I have chronicled
you have chronicled
he/she/it has chronicled
we have chronicled
you have chronicled
they have chronicled
Past Continuous
I was chronicling
you were chronicling
he/she/it was chronicling
we were chronicling
you were chronicling
they were chronicling
Past Perfect
I had chronicled
you had chronicled
he/she/it had chronicled
we had chronicled
you had chronicled
they had chronicled
Future
I will chronicle
you will chronicle
he/she/it will chronicle
we will chronicle
you will chronicle
they will chronicle
Future Perfect
I will have chronicled
you will have chronicled
he/she/it will have chronicled
we will have chronicled
you will have chronicled
they will have chronicled
Future Continuous
I will be chronicling
you will be chronicling
he/she/it will be chronicling
we will be chronicling
you will be chronicling
they will be chronicling
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been chronicling
you have been chronicling
he/she/it has been chronicling
we have been chronicling
you have been chronicling
they have been chronicling
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been chronicling
you will have been chronicling
he/she/it will have been chronicling
we will have been chronicling
you will have been chronicling
they will have been chronicling
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been chronicling
you had been chronicling
he/she/it had been chronicling
we had been chronicling
you had been chronicling
they had been chronicling
Conditional
I would chronicle
you would chronicle
he/she/it would chronicle
we would chronicle
you would chronicle
they would chronicle
Past Conditional
I would have chronicled
you would have chronicled
he/she/it would have chronicled
we would have chronicled
you would have chronicled
they would have chronicled
Collins English Verb Tables © HarperCollins Publishers 2011

chronicle

A chronological account of events.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.chronicle - a record or narrative description of past eventschronicle - a record or narrative description of past events; "a history of France"; "he gave an inaccurate account of the plot to kill the president"; "the story of exposure to lead"
history - the discipline that records and interprets past events involving human beings; "he teaches Medieval history"; "history takes the long view"
ancient history - a history of the ancient world
etymology - a history of a word
case history - detailed record of the background of a person or group under study or treatment
historical document, historical paper, historical record - writing having historical value (as opposed to fiction or myth etc.)
chronological record, annals - a chronological account of events in successive years
biography, life history, life story, life - an account of the series of events making up a person's life
record - anything (such as a document or a phonograph record or a photograph) providing permanent evidence of or information about past events; "the film provided a valuable record of stage techniques"
recital - a detailed account or description of something; "he was forced to listen to a recital of his many shortcomings"
Verb1.chronicle - record in chronological order; make a historical record
record, enter, put down - make a record of; set down in permanent form
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

chronicle

verb
1. record, tell, report, enter, relate, register, recount, set down, narrate, put on record The rise of collectivism in Britain has been chronicled by several historians.
noun
1. record, story, history, account, register, journal, diary, narrative, annals this vast chronicle of Napoleonic times
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

chronicle

noun
1. A chronological record of past events:
2. A recounting of past events:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
سِجِل زَمَني للأحْداثيُسَجِّلُ الأحداث زَمَنِيّا
kronikazaznamenat do kroniky
årbogkrønikenedskriveoptegne
annállfæra í annál
kronikakronikininkasrašyti kroniką
hronikarakstīt hroniku
kronikapísať do kroniky
tarihsel kayda geçirmekvakayinamevakayinameye yazmak

chronicle

[ˈkrɒnɪkl]
A. Ncrónica f
Chronicles (Bible) → Crónicas fpl
B. VT (= recount) → hacer una crónica de
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

chronicle

[ˈkrɒnɪkəl]
n (= account) → chronique f
vt [+ events] → faire la chronique dechronic wasting disease nmaladie f du dépérissement chronique
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

chronicle

nChronik f; Chronicles pl (Bibl) → Bücher plder Chronik
vtaufzeichnen; historic events alsoeine Chronik (+gen)verfassen
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

chronicle

[ˈkrɒnɪkl] ncronaca
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

chronicle

(ˈkronikl) noun
a record of (especially historical) events in order of time.
verb
to make such a record.
ˈchronicler noun
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
One thing the Normans had brought was a liking for history, and soon there sprang up a whole race of chroniclers. They, like Bede, were monks and priests.
But in the Crusades we already see an event occupying its definite place in history and without which we cannot imagine the modern history of Europe, though to the chroniclers of the Crusades that event appeared as merely due to the will of certain people.
("Aescendum" in the chroniclers), which broke the Danish power, and made England a Christian land.
It is the fate of all authors or chroniclers to create imaginary friends, and lose them in the course of art.
The chronicler of passing events sat through it, motionless, with suspended pen; and when the movement was complete Poesy was represented in that place by nothing but a warm spot on the wooden chair.
The whale has no famous author, and whaling no famous chronicler, you will say.
Chronicler's are privileged to enter where they list, to come and go through keyholes, to ride upon the wind, to overcome, in their soarings up and down, all obstacles of distance, time, and place.
And thou, O sage magician, whoever thou art, to whom it shall fall to be the chronicler of this wondrous history, forget not, I entreat thee, my good Rocinante, the constant companion of my ways and wanderings." Presently he broke out again, as if he were love-stricken in earnest, "O Princess Dulcinea, lady of this captive heart, a grievous wrong hast thou done me to drive me forth with scorn, and with inexorable obduracy banish me from the presence of thy beauty.
The proverbial Englishman, we know from old chronicler Froissart, takes his pleasures sadly, and the Englishwoman goes a step further and takes her pleasures in sadness itself.
All these wonders and magical effects which the chronicler has heaped up, or rather embalmed, in his recital, at the risk of rivaling the brain-born scenes of romancers; these splendors whereby night seemed vanquished and nature corrected, together with every delight and luxury combined for the satisfaction of all the senses, as well as the imagination, Fouquet did in real truth offer to his sovereign in that enchanting retreat of which no monarch could at that time boast of possessing an equal.
For example, ten or twelve years before, a shower of small frogs had fallen, as is credibly attested by a contemporaneous chronicle, the record concluding with a somewhat obscure statement to the effect that the chronicler considered it good growing-weather for Frenchmen.
Remember my words, Devenham,--when our chronicler dips his pen into the ink and writes of our government, our foreign policy, at least, will be judged by our position in the far East.