Chuang Tzu


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Chuang Tzu

 (chwäng′ dzŭ′) also Zhuang·zi (jwäng′dzŭ′) c. 369-286 bc.
Chinese Taoist philosopher who advocated a skeptical approach to knowledge and a willing acceptance of change as a means of unifying oneself with the Tao.
References in classic literature ?
And while I pour and sip my Scotch, I remember another Chinese philosopher, Chuang Tzu, who, four centuries before Christ, challenged this dreamland of the world, saying: "How then do I know but that the dead repent of having previously clung to life?
"Once upon a time, I, Chuang Tzu, dreamt I was a butterfly, fluttering hither and thither, to all intents and purposes a butterfly.
Chuang Tzu (Zhuangzi or Master Zhuang) also adhered to the idea that harmony is best achieved by leaving people alone to pursue their own interests.
Featured are over 100 felicitous selections from Chuang Tzu, Lao Tzu, Li Po, Confucius, and many others including: "The one who knows does not speak.
Chuang Tzu's Nei P'ien Psychotherapeutic Commentaries: A Wayfaring Counselor's Rendering of the Seven Interior Records
I and Tao: Martin Buber's encounter with Chuang Tzu. Albany, NY: SUNY Press.
But if Dante is right and I am wrong, I hope to land in his First Circle of Hell along with Buddha, Socrates, Chuang Tzu, and other freethinkers.
(10) Chuang-tzu, Chuang Tzu: Basic Writings, trans.
(6.) Shao Peiren & Yao Jinyun, "On Recipient in Communication: The Receiving Subjectivity of Chuang Tzu, Hui-neng and Wang Yangming," Journalism & Communication, No.10 (2014), pp.5.]
The complete works of Chuang Tzu. New York: Columbia University Press.
108-109) Another important source for the study of interality is "The Secret of Caring for Life" ([TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]), which is the third chapter of The Complete Works of Chuang Tzu. The chapter tells the story of Cook Ting who cuts up oxen by running his knife through intervals, without touching ligaments, tendons, or joints, thereby keeping the knife intact after nineteen years of use, which is a parable about how to care for life.
Woodcock's knowledge of the major progenitors of Taoism, Lao Tzu and Chuang Tzu, came from two sources: the thought of Herbert Read and the writings of Oscar Wilde.