Chukchi

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Chuk·chi

also Chuk·chee  (cho͝ok′chē)
n. pl. Chukchi or Chuk·chis also Chukchee or Chuk·chees
1. A member of a people of northeast Siberia.
2. The language of the Chukchi, noted for being pronounced differently by men and women.

[Russian, pl. of chukcha, from Chukchi chawchəw.]

Chukchi

(ˈtʃʊktʃɪ) or

Chukchee

npl -chi, -chis, -chee or -chees
1. (Peoples) a member of a people of the Chukchi Peninsula
2. (Languages) the language of this people, related only to some of the smaller aboriginal languages of Siberia

Chuk•chi

or Chuk•chee

(ˈtʃʊk tʃi)

n., pl. -chis or -chees, (esp. collectively) -chi or -chee.
1. a member of a Paleosiberian people inhabiting the Chukchi Peninsula and adjacent areas of extreme NE Siberia.
2. the language of the Chukchis.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Chukchi - a member of an indigenous people living on the Chukchi Peninsula
Siberian - a native or inhabitant of Siberia
2.Chukchi - an indigenous and isolated language of unknown origin spoken by the Chukchi that is pronounced differently by men and women
natural language, tongue - a human written or spoken language used by a community; opposed to e.g. a computer language
References in periodicals archive ?
The topics include opening pathways in Kamchatkan hunting and herding rituals, dwelling in the landscape among the reindeer herding Chukchis of Chukotka, and ancient Saami landscapes in northern coastal Sweden.
Alla viven varias etnias, entre ellas los chukchis a quienes la peninsula debe su nombre.
La esclavitud como tal, los chukchis la practicaban desde los siglos XVII-XVIII cuando unos grupos de cazadores de morsas y focas cruzaban el estrecho de Bering en los barcos forrados con pieles de animales maritimos y asaltaban y saqueaban a los poblados riberenos del continente americano llegando inclusive hasta las costas de la Canada contemporanea.
Less well known is the fact that they were followed by the Chukchis, a reindeerherding people, and it was they, not the Inuit, who mastered the barren tundra.
In time, these Chukchis ousted the Inuit from all but a tiny fringe of the Bering Sea coast, and went on to resist incursions by Europeans for 300 years.
It is not difficult to imagine what happened when newcomers from more southerly regions--the last Samoyed (the direct ancestors of the modern-day Nenets), the Tungus in the east, or the Chukchis on the Pacific coastline--entered this sparse population.
Eleven thousand years ago what is now the Bering Sea and the Chukchi Seas was dry land and is known to paleobiogeographers as Beringia.
Strandberg and Ivarrson's epic journey was motivated by a desire to record the way of life of indigenous people such as the Chukchis, Evenks, Yakuts and Yagahirs who live along the banks of the Kolyma.
Olgoonik/Fairweather LLC is being honored by the 2015 Arctic Technology Conference (ATC) with a Distinguished Achievement Award for its contribution to the Chukchi Sea Environmental Science Program (CSESP).
The CSESP is focused on characterizing pre-exploration baseline information on the ecology of the northeastern Chukchi Sea.
Whalers also took fin whales in the southwestern Chukchi Sea, but only five sightings have been reported for the entire Chukchi Sea in the past 30 years.
Key words: fin whale, Balaenoptera physalus, Chukchi Sea, distribution, detection, passive acoustic monitoring, song, stock assessment