chupacabra

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chupacabra

a vicious animal said to exist in parts of Central America where it attacks animals, especially goats
Abused, Confused, & Misused Words by Mary Embree Copyright © 2007, 2013 by Mary Embree
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In the end, because Lourd de Veyra is also part of the album, his performance piece "Reading Lang Leav My F*cking Head Exploded" was aired just before "Satan Rules" by Easy Fagela with Los Chupacabras capped the show.
Etymology.--The 'chupacabras' is the name of a mythological creature from an urban legend that is widespread in Latin America; it holds that this strange, reptilian creature roams around rural areas and feeds by sucking the blood of livestock.
"It was important for the story to be universal but being Mexican-American it was also important for the script to include specific cultural Latino references such as El Dia de los Muertos, The Chupacabras, Los Duendes, stories and myths that all Latinos heard about growing up, and show authentic moments such as the altars to honor our ancestors and blessings when we leave the house, things that we as Latinos have experienced in our families," says writer and producer Yelyna De Leon.
"People label dog-like cryptic beasts 'Chupacabras' because they love mysteries, and it's the hip thing to do," she said.
The competitors include a variety of quirky characters, including Lengua de Lagarto, or Lizard Tongue, whose tongue is tied "just so." There's Grumpy Granny, who raps about a raggedy cat, and El Chupacabras, who loves to eat critters, "even insects are for me / cows and cats and doggies too / chupa chupa chupa cabras, BOO!" Many of the tongue twisters included in this unique picture book for young children ages 6 to 9 and will be familiar to Spanish-speaking children-and their parents too!
They search for chupacabras and lake monsters, document and try to understand stories of encounters with flying monsters, ghosts and poltergeists.
Eventually, Vanessa realizes that the brutal murders of people and animals around her friend's ranch are the work of shape-shifting naguals who can turn themselves into Chupacabras.
When a pack of Chupacabras run loose and threaten to overtake the city, man and beast fight to the death.
In a final interpretive chapter, Roman considers the 1994 chupacabras rumors and seeks to account for the attitude of satire and bacilon with which the issue was approached by Puerto Ricans, as well as how these alleged bloodsucking beasts articulated a crisis of credibility with government.