church school

(redirected from Church schools)
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Noun1.church school - a private religious school run by a church or parishchurch school - a private religious school run by a church or parish
religious school - a school run by a religious body
Catholic school - a parochial school maintained by the Catholic Church
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References in classic literature ?
He would not say whether or not she had attached herself to the sound Low Church School of his father; but she would probably be open to conviction on that point; she was a regular church-goer of simple faith; honest-hearted, receptive, intelligent, graceful to a degree, chaste as a vestal, and, in personal appearance, exceptionally beautiful.
A spokesman for Worcestershire County Council said the authority welcomed the diversity and choice of schools in the area and wished to maintain the balance of community and church schools.
REGARDING St Margaret of Antioch school, Bishop Ian Stuart, chairman of the Liverpool Diocesan Board of Education, says (ECHO letters, February 21) he fully endorses my sentiments on the importance of church schools - but that the DBE is required to operate within the appropriate statutory framework.
"Churches and church schools should rely on private donations, not public support."
"Churches are persecuted, church schools and buildings are bulldozed and church leaders are harassed and detained," he said.
Dugan, Jr., appropriately criticizes the 1978 proposal by the IRS to remove tax exemptions of church schools with "insufficient" percentages of minority students, a wholly unworkable plan.
Church schools by their nature are places of openness and exploration and make an invaluable contribution to the richness of education in Wales.
When it first opened, in common with most village church schools of the time, it took children of all ages.
"It is very important that church schools remain open, as parents want those values for their children.
Sir, - In your article (Post, Jun 12), regarding the visit of the Archbishop of Canterbury to the University of Birmingham, you reported that the Archbishop referred to Church schools and made it sound as if this was the main theme of his address.
This principle -- which asserts that government aid to overwhelmingly religious entities such as churches and church schools inevitably advances religion -- has been a staple of church-state legal theory for decades, but Thomas blithely dismissed it.
No, not a Sunday school but one of almost 300 maintained church schools that are part of the education landscape in Wales, and a significant feature of the 'learning country's' rugged terrain.