churinga


Also found in: Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

churinga

(tʃəˈrɪŋɡə)
n, pl -ga or -gas
(Anthropology & Ethnology) a sacred amulet of the native Australians
[from a native Australian language]
References in periodicals archive ?
A slightly more detailed version was also published in Spencer and Gillen (1912:267) Across Australia the same year, where Spencer claimed to have described Howitt and Fison as men 'who could send out Churinga [sacred objects] and make boys into men'.
We also knew that the return of a particularly significant churinga would exacerbate these troubles and probably lead to physical violence.
Earlier spelt as churinga (Spencer and Gillen 1899:123) and tjurunga as in Strehlow (1970:102).
Though in the myths some Ancestors were killed or disappeared beyond the boundaries of the people who sang about them, and others were metamorphosed as physiographic features (for example, a rocky outcrop or a waterhole) or manifested as or through sacred ritual objects usually of wood or stone (in Aranda tywerrenge, anglicized churinga ), their essential quality remains undiminished.
It becomes a form of "churinga": a totemic object used in group rituals (Durkheim 1995: 118-122).
*** I have printed a set of the Echunpa [perentie] pictures for Sambo and have had a neat shallow tin case made to hold them and they are to be taken and deposited with the Churinga in the Ertnatulinga [storehouse cave] shortly.
At each of these spots...certain number of the Alcheringa ancestors went into the ground, each one carrying his Churinga [board] with him.
In central Australia, clan religious life frequently involves an object called a churinga; Durkheim notes that similar objects exist in the north (the nurtunja) and in the south (the waninga), and he describes the latter as closely resembling a flag (EFRL: 123-125).
In this sense, the churinga ilkinia (atywerrenge-designs) would fall into the former.
Gillen's letters jump from subject to subject; from species of frog, to marriage classes, to mineral investment and churinga. He is as anxious to have his name associated with a new natural species as he is to be the author of a new interpretation of variations in marriage classes or the significance of churinga.
The loss of Churinga is the most significant evil that could befall any local group' (Jones 1992:118 (9)), no effort had been made to restore possession since 1897 when Gillen had confessed to him that 'there must be no more ertatulnga robberies.