cibachrome


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cibachrome

(ˈsiːbəˌkrəʊm)
n
(Printing, Lithography & Bookbinding) the old name for the Ilfochrome photographic printing process
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Don't miss Philip Pocock's cibachrome photographs of Berlin in the early 1980s, at Inda gallery (Fig.
The Cibachrome prints of fine art photographer Garry Fabian Miller inspired the Ruby Embers Hearth Rug, the third in a series and tufted at Dovecot Studios in Edinburgh by Kristi Vana and Louise Trotter.
Yet if the eschewal of photographic appropriation in "Natural Magic" marked a fundamental transition in her practice, the series--comprising eleven photographs and shown here in its entirety for the first time since 1993--nevertheless retained many of the most recognizable elements from previous projects: the high-gloss Cibachrome prints with matching lacquered frames, the frequent use of veils and draped satin, the isolation of an object against a monochrome ground, the collapsed sense of space.
Another work by the artist, Office Baroque, is a Cibachrome photograph made in 1977 in what was the former office of a shipping company in the port of Antwerp, that had gone out of business (broke).
Conservation status, cibachrome photographs and relationships of some species are also included.
(40) Twenty years later, controversy was deliberately courted in Andres Serrano's Morgue Series (first shown in New York in 1993), where familiar arguments over the aestheticisation of death attended his large cibachrome colour images of details of bodies from a New York city morgue, all callously titled with an abrupt cause of death (Death by Drowning, Knifed to Death, Rat Poison Suicide, and so on).
The works show a wide variety of printing methods including platinum/palladium, cibachrome, cyanotype, gum bichromate, polaroid image transfers, copper plate photogravure, photopolymer engravings and gelatin silver prints.
"He used a technique called Cibachrome, which gives very rich, glossy images, a bit like Technicolor.
The resultant urban landscapes of chrome and glass office blocks, concrete open spaces, and complex traffic systems, are exposed over one another (not always in the same direction) and printed on cibachrome --a high-quality paper not commonly used nowadays that gives a color image exceptional brilliance.
? [umlaut] William Hustler and Georgina Hustler/National Portrait Gallery, London Title: Queen Elizabeth II (cibachrome print) Artist: Eve Arnold Date: 1968 Background: Legendary American photojournalist Eve Arnold joined Magnum Photos in 1951.
* Above, Dorothy Wilding's photograph taken to mark the Queen's accession to the throne in 1952 * Eve Arnold's 1968 Cibachrome print and, bottom, Dorothy Wilding's 1952 hand-coloured bromide print * Pietro Annigoni's 1969 oil painting, commissioned by the National Portrait Gallery * Justin Mortimer's 1998 oil on canvas, left, and Chris Levine's 2007 photographic portrait, Lightness of Being * Hiroshi Sugimoto's 1999 photograph of a wax mannequin of the Queen