Cicero


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Cic·er·o

 (sĭs′ə-rō′), Marcus Tullius 106-43 bc.
Roman statesman, orator, and philosopher. A major figure in the last years of the Republic, he is best known for his orations against Catiline and for his mastery of Latin prose. His later writings introduced Greek philosophy to Rome.

Cic′e·ro′ni·an adj.

cicero

(ˈsɪsəˌrəʊ)
n, pl -ros
(Printing, Lithography & Bookbinding) a measure for type that is somewhat larger than the pica
[C19: from its first being used in a 15th-century edition of the writings of Marcus Tullius Cicero (106–43 bc), the Roman consul, orator, and writer]

Cicero

(ˈsɪsəˌrəʊ)
n
(Biography) Marcus Tullius (ˈmɑːkəs ˈtʌlɪəs). 106–43 bc, Roman consul, orator, and writer. He foiled Catiline's conspiracy (63) and was killed by Mark Antony's agents after he denounced Antony in the Philippics. His writings are regarded as a model of Latin prose. Formerly known in English as: Tully

Cic•e•ro

(ˈsɪs əˌroʊ)

n.
1. Marcus Tullius, ( “Tully” ), 106–43 B.C., Roman statesman, orator, and writer.
2. a city in NE Illinois, near Chicago. 61,670.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cicero - a linear unit of the size of type slightly larger than an em
linear measure, linear unit - a unit of measurement of length
2.Cicero - a Roman statesman and orator remembered for his mastery of Latin prose (106-43 BC)Cicero - a Roman statesman and orator remembered for his mastery of Latin prose (106-43 BC)
Translations
Cicero

Cicero

[ˈsɪsərəʊ] NCicerón

Cicero

[ˈsɪsəˌrəʊ] nCicerone m
References in classic literature ?
The mate of the Cicero was seeing his friend on board.
Of this state hear what Cicero saith: Quam volumus licet, patres conscripti, nos amemus, tamen nec numero Hispanos, nec robore Gallos, nec calliditate Poenos, nec artibus Graecos, nec denique hoc ipso hujus gentis et terrae domestico nativoque sensu Italos ipsos et Latinos; sed pietate, ac religione, atque hac una sapientia, quod deorum immortalium numine omnia regi gubernarique perspeximus, omnes gentes nationesque superavimus.
As Garrick, whom I regard in tragedy to be the greatest genius the world hath ever produced, sometimes condescends to play the fool; so did Scipio the Great, and Laelius the Wise, according to Horace, many years ago; nay, Cicero reports them to have been "incredibly childish.
Cicero, when he buried his darling and only daughter, had a heart as full of honest grief as poor Tom's,--perhaps no fuller, for both were only men;--but Cicero could pause over no such sublime words of hope, and look to no such future reunion; and if he had seen them, ten to one he would not have believed,--he must fill his head first with a thousand questions of authenticity of manuscript, and correctness of translation.
I ask you, Messer Cicero, and Messer Seneca, copies of whom, all dog's-eared, I behold scattered on the floor, what profits it me to know, better than any governor of the mint, or any Jew on the Pont aux Changeurs, that a golden crown stamped with a crown is worth thirty-five unzains of twenty-five sous, and eight deniers parisis apiece, and that a crown stamped with a crescent is worth thirty-six unzains of twenty-six sous, six deniers tournois apiece, if I have not a single wretched black liard to risk on the double-six
de Port Royal, and he had made a collection, en passant, in the society of Athos and Aramis, of many morsels of Seneca and Cicero, translated by them, and applied to the uses of common life.
Contact person: Junta de Gobierno del Ayuntamiento de Brcena de Cicero
With Caesar's well-known assassination (Peter De Jersey managing his bloodstained writhings with consummate skill) we get his adopted son Octavius (Oliver Johnstone in a fascinating performance as a 19-year-old with the political savvy of an octogenarian) getting much of his adoptive father's wealth, while Cicero is left hoping in vain that Rome will revert once more to a well-governed state.
How did it come to pass, asks Springer, that pagan Roman master of Latin eloquence Cicero could make such a favorable impression so many centuries later on biblical theologian Luther, who believed that eternal salvation was dependent upon faith in Jesus Christ alone and is often referred to as the father of the German language.
The dominant view of Cicero, almost from the time of his death at the hands of the Second Triumvirate, focused on his voluminous writings and doomed efforts to save Rome's republic.
Cicero, of Eugene, said she saw him wading in the water as she and a friend were preparing to float the river.
3) As for the two people who acquired copies of this treatise before Cicero could present Brutus, the dedicatee, with a copy, our knowledge varies considerably.