Santa Fe Trail

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Santa Fe Trail

A trade route to the southwest United States extending from Missouri to Santa Fe, New Mexico. First traversed in 1821, it was the primary wagon and stage route to the Southwest until the coming of the railroad in 1880.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Santa Fe Trail

(ˈsæntə ˈfeɪ)
n
(Placename) an important trade route in the western US from about 1821 to 1880, linking Independence, Missouri to Santa Fe, New Mexico
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

San′ta Fe′ Trail′


n.
a trade route between Independence, Missouri, and Santa Fe, New Mexico, used from about 1821 to 1880.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Santa Fe Trail - a trail that extends from Missouri to New MexicoSanta Fe Trail - a trail that extends from Missouri to New Mexico; an important route for settlers moving west in the 19th century
western United States, West - the region of the United States lying to the west of the Mississippi River
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
On the Cimarron Cutoff on the old Santa Fe Trail, the Arkansas River had to be crossed and at times the animals had to swim for some distance.
The trade-off for taking the Cimarron Cutoff was a dreaded 50-mile march across waterless desert, and vulnerability to Comanche and Kiowa attacks.