cinnamon

(redirected from Cinamon)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.

cin·na·mon

 (sĭn′ə-mən)
n.
1.
a. The dried aromatic inner bark of certain tropical Asian trees of the genus Cinnamomum, especially C. verum and cassia (C. aromaticum), often ground and used as a spice.
b. A tree yielding this bark.
2. A light reddish brown.
adj.
1. Flavored with cinnamon.
2. Of a light reddish brown.

[Middle English cinamome, from Old French, from Latin cinnamōmum, from Greek kinnamōmon, probably of Semitic origin; akin to Hebrew qinnāmôn.]

cin·nam′ic (sə-năm′ĭk) adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

cinnamon

(ˈsɪnəmən)
n
1. (Plants) a tropical Asian lauraceous tree, Cinnamomum zeylanicum, having aromatic yellowish-brown bark
2. (Cookery) the spice obtained from the bark of this tree, used for flavouring food and drink
3. (Plants) Saigon cinnamon an E Asian lauraceous tree, Cinnamomum loureirii, the bark of which is used as a cordial and to relieve flatulence
4. (Plants) any of several similar or related trees or their bark. See cassia2
5. (Colours)
a. a light yellowish brown
b. (as modifier): a cinnamon coat.
[C15: from Old French cinnamome, via Latin and Greek, from Hebrew qinnamown]
cinˈnamic, cinnamonic adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

cin•na•mon

(ˈsɪn ə mən)

n.
1. the aromatic inner bark of any of several East Indian trees belonging to the genus Cinnamonum, of the laurel family: used, in dried and often powdered form, as a spice.
2. any tree yielding such bark.
3. a yellowish or reddish brown.
adj.
4. (of food) flavored with cinnamon.
5. reddish brown or yellowish brown.
[1400–50; late Middle English cinamome < Middle French < Latin cinnam(ōm)um < Greek kinná(mō)mon < Semitic (compare Hebrew qinnāmōn)]
cin`na•mon′ic (-ˈmɒn ɪk) adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cinnamon - aromatic bark used as a spicecinnamon - aromatic bark used as a spice  
Ceylon cinnamon, Ceylon cinnamon tree, Cinnamomum zeylanicum, cinnamon - tropical Asian tree with aromatic yellowish-brown bark; source of the spice cinnamon
bark - tough protective covering of the woody stems and roots of trees and other woody plants
2.cinnamon - tropical Asian tree with aromatic yellowish-brown barkcinnamon - tropical Asian tree with aromatic yellowish-brown bark; source of the spice cinnamon
cinnamon - spice from the dried aromatic bark of the Ceylon cinnamon tree; used as rolled strips or ground
laurel - any of various aromatic trees of the laurel family
Cinnamomum, genus Cinnamomum - Asiatic and Australian aromatic trees and shrubs
cinnamon, cinnamon bark - aromatic bark used as a spice
3.cinnamon - spice from the dried aromatic bark of the Ceylon cinnamon tree; used as rolled strips or ground
spice - any of a variety of pungent aromatic vegetable substances used for flavoring food
stick cinnamon - dried rolled strips of cinnamon bark
Ceylon cinnamon, Ceylon cinnamon tree, Cinnamomum zeylanicum, cinnamon - tropical Asian tree with aromatic yellowish-brown bark; source of the spice cinnamon
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
شَجَرَةُ القِرْفِهقرفةقِرْفَة
канела
skořiceskořicovník
kanel
canelacanelocolor canela
kanelikanelinmakuinenkanelinruskeakanelipuuceyloninkaneli
cimet
fahéjfahéjasfahéjfa
kanill
シナモン
계피
cinnamum
cinamonas
kanēlis
kaneelkaneelboom
scorţişoară
škorica
cimet
kaneläkta kanel
อบเชย
quế

cinnamon

[ˈsɪnəmən] Ncanela f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

cinnamon

[ˈsɪnəmən] n (= spice) → cannelle f cinnamon stick, cinnamon toastcinnamon stick nbâton m de cannellecinnamon toast ntoast m à la cannelle
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

cinnamon

nZimt m
adj attr
cake, biscuitZimt-
(colour) → zimtfarben
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

cinnamon

[ˈsɪnəmən] ncannella
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

cinnamon

(ˈsinəmən) noun
the bark of a tree of the laurel family, used as a spice.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

cinnamon

قِرْفَة skořice kanel Zimt κανέλα canela kaneli cannelle cimet cannella シナモン 계피 kaneel kanel cynamon canela корица kanel อบเชย tarçın quế 桂皮
Multilingual Translator © HarperCollins Publishers 2009

cin·na·mon

n. canela.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Cinamon studied two types of conflict between work and family.
Most research on WFC antecedents and outcomes use generic models to study managerial and demanding occupations (Cinamon & Rich, 2005).
Cinamon and Rich created a work-family conflict intervention program for novice teachers and their supervisors with five goals: raise managers' awareness; enhance managers' understanding of family-friendly policy; contribute to the understanding of novice teachers, who would be more apt to have work-family concerns; improve the skills and attitudes of novice teachers, enabling a blending of professional and personal roles; and increase the self-efficacy of these teachers regarding how to manage work-family conflict.
As a result, addressing work-family issues as part of students' career programs may potentially facilitate young adults' formulation of realistic future plans that combine dual roles (Barnett et al., 2003; Cinamon & Rich, 2004).
To examine their perceptions of the world of work, Cinamon and Gifsh conducted semistructured interviews with 16 mixed sex adolescents and young adults with mild mental retardation.
Research studies that have dealt with life roles include clients with diagnosed cumulative trauma disorders (Dale et al., 2003); clients with spinal cord injury (Quigley, 1995); college student development (Niles, Sowa, & Laden, 1994); gender differences (Cinamon & Rich, 2002); dual-career couples (Rajadhyaksha & Bhatnagar, 2000); and international perspectives, such as the Work Importance Study (Super & Sverko, 1995).
Rachel Gali Cinamon and Limor Gifsh, Counseling Department, School of Education, Tel Aviv University.
Contains coffee to fight cellulite and cinamon to increase circulation.
Cinamon and Rich reported that incompatible pressures from work and family domains have predictably different influences on diverse groups of people, depending on the importance they attribute to life roles.
There's some savoury spice on the nose from oak ageing with vanilla and cinamon up in the mix.
The role of parental support is crucial in terms of the development of CDMSE, especially during adolescents' developmental stage (Michael, Most, & Cinamon, 2013).