Cinderella

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Related to Cinderella syndrome: Cinderella complex, Sleeping beauty syndrome

Cin·der·el·la

 (sĭn′də-rĕl′ə)
n.
One that unexpectedly achieves recognition or success after a period of obscurity and neglect.

[After Cinderella, , the fairy-tale character who escapes from a life of drudgery and marries a prince, translation of French Cendrillon.]

Cinderella

(ˌsɪndəˈrɛlə)
n
1. a girl who achieves fame after being obscure
2.
a. a poor, neglected, or unsuccessful person or thing
b. (as modifier): a Cinderella service within the NHS.
3. (modifier) relating to dramatic success: a Cinderella story.
[C19: after Cinderella, the heroine of a fairy tale who is aided by a fairy godmother]

Cin•der•el•la

(ˌsɪn dəˈrɛl ə)

n., pl. -las.
1. a heroine of a fairy tale who is maltreated by a stepmother but achieves happiness and marries a prince through the intervention of a fairy godmother.
2. a person who achieves sudden success, esp. after obscurity or neglect.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Cinderella - a woman whose merits were not been recognized but who then achieves sudden success and recognitionCinderella - a woman whose merits were not been recognized but who then achieves sudden success and recognition
adult female, woman - an adult female person (as opposed to a man); "the woman kept house while the man hunted"
2.Cinderella - a fictional young girl who is saved from her stepmother and stepsisters by her fairy godmother and a handsome prince
Translations
Popelka
Askepot
Cindrulino
Tuhkimo
Pepeljuga
Hamupipőke
シンデレラ
Askepott
Cinderela
Popoluška
Pepelka
Pepeljuga
Askungen

Cinderella

[ˌsɪndəˈrelə] NCenicienta f
it's the Cinderella of the artses la hermana pobre de las artes

Cinderella

[ˌsɪndəˈrɛlə] nCendrillon

Cinderella

n (lit, fig)Aschenputtel nt

Cinderella

[ˌsɪndəˈrɛlə] nCenerentola
References in periodicals archive ?
Somehow we all love to see an underdog doing so well and reading reports of players dropped from the more prestigious football teams to make such a comeback somehow seems to appeal to the Cinderella syndrome we apparently all relate to.
Their topics include definitions and the roots of oppression, lessons from inquiries, physical and physiological factors in child development, psychosocial factors in child development, the fear factor, siblings and the Cinderella syndrome, inappropriate roles for children, from assessment to response, attachment issues, family support and intervention, and promoting resilience in children.