clade

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clade

 (klād)
n.
A grouping of organisms made on the basis of their presumed evolutionary history, consisting of a common ancestor and all of its descendants.

[From Greek klados, branch.]

clade

(kleɪd)
n
(Biology) biology a group of organisms considered as having evolved from a common ancestor
[C20: from Greek klados branch, shoot]

clade

(kleɪd)

n.
a group of organisms sharing features that reflect a common ancestor or descent.
[1957; < Greek kládos branch]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.clade - a group of biological taxa or species that share features inherited from a common ancestor
biological group - a group of plants or animals
Translations
clade
References in periodicals archive ?
2013), we urge the WoRMS to reconsider its nomenclatural decision and reassert the retention of the clade Crassostrea as the correct genus for cupped oysters from both the Pacific and the Atlantic.
The sequenced samples fell into 3 well-supported major clades (Figure 1) that are largely structured by region.
In Clade I, only the species of Hebeloma section Theobromina Vesterholt are present (HE649368.
The ML tree showed that two HOs of Heliopora caerulea were separated into two clades (bootstrap value of 100%; clades 1 and 2 in Fig.
Two different clades A and E were named according to the nomenclature suggested by Liu et al.
Consistently with the latest molecular phytogenies proposed for Cypereae, our results support the division of this tribe into two big groups with spikelet characters more or less typical and/or unique: the Cyperus and the Ficinia clades.
Six aeglid crab species were used in this study, belonging to two different clades in phylogeny presented by Perez-Losada et al.
The Calomyscus samples from eastern Iran were separated into two distinct major clades in both BI and ML trees (Fig.
A total of 13 otter species are found in the world comprising seven distinct genera consisting of three major clades based on nuclear and mitochondrial markers (Koepfli and Wayne 1998).
1989), meaning that population bottlenecks leading to reduced genetic variation and (female) effective size can be more easily detected than with nuclear-encoded DNA, in part because the mtDNA clades in the three rivers were thought to be fixed (Broughton et al.