clag


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clag

(klæɡ)
n
sticky mud
vb (intr) , clags, clagged or clagging
to stick, as mud
[C16: perhaps of Scandinavian origin, related to Danish klag sticky mud]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Ashgrove Secretaries Limited Secretary - Alldeal Trading Limited Ashdown Secretaries Limited Secretary - Clag International Limited Nigel D'Arcy Secretary - Gokey Limited Ashdown Secretaries Limited Secretary - The Luxury Dubliners Trading Company Limited
Richard - Their work is invaluable Mick - The Killermeters were part of a great line-up of bands that took part in the 'Clag Beast - Mick - The music scene is very healthy.
Fue en la decada de 1980 que nos encontramos en un congreso de la Conferencia de Geografos Latino Americanistas (CLAG) y asi fuimos construyendo una amistad, por encuentros sucesivos en estas reuniones academicas.
His force is in the financial clag. It is set to lose pounds 60 million over two years due to Government cuts.
Rain, wind, clag and more rain have been frequent companions as I have lost my way on the Carneddau, battled "the fear" on Bristly Ridge and frozenmyears off on Cadair Idris.
A Combined Law Agencies Group (CLAG) continued to meet monthly to address law enforcement issues, including trafficking in persons.
Claggart se naam kan met die verouderde Engelse werkwoord clag verbind word, wat beteken "to stick closely to something in an unhealthy manner" (Cooke, 1993:19).
Here I am at 15,000 feet with 3.2, in the clag. The weather mins for Grand Junction's TACANA circling approach are 1300/3 for Category C and D aircraft--not even close.
OTHERS: addle 'to earn, gain'; algate 'always, in every way, in any case'; bain 'ready, willing'; baiter 'to dance'; bask 'bitter, irritating to the senses'; clag 'to bedaub, clog'; hag 'to cut, hew, chop'; nait 'useful, good at need'; ra 'a sail-yard'; risp 'to rub, to grate together; to rasp or file'; scraw 'a scroll or tag of parchment or leather'; slape 'slippery, smooth; also crafty, cunning, deceitful'; snod 'smooth, sleek; even'; stoop 'a post, pillar'; streak "to stroke; to make level, flat or even; to rub or smear; to spread, lay evenly'; uthe 'harmony'; withgang 'success, advantage, profit';
Despite the Fusilier's optimism, the 'clag' proves too thick for safe helicopter travel.
The idea here was to seek evidence in support of the hypothesis that Shetland speech is more 'Scandinavian' than that of Orkney, inasmuch as Shetlanders observe more closely than do Orcadians the Scandinavian pattern whereby if a vowel is long the following consonant is short, and vice versa (there is, in other words, a more robust V:C/VC: alternation in pairs like clag 'to clog' and claag 'to gossip, chatter' or back and bauk 'baulk, hen roost' in Shetland than in Orkney).