Clapham Sect


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Clapham Sect

(ˈklæpəm)
n
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a group of early 19th-century Church of England evangelicals advocating personal piety, the abolition of slavery, etc
[C19: named after Clapham, a district of London]
References in periodicals archive ?
Growing up in the lively environment of the Clapham Sect made an indelible impression on young James.
After that the author turns to the Clapham Sect and the creation of a network of relations and friends that would play a large role in nineteenth and even twentieth century history.
With the observances of the 200th anniversary of the 1807 act abolishing the slave trade, it is easy to focus on the prime characters like Wilberforce, Clarkson and the Clapham Sect.
INFLUENCE: His self-indulgent lifestyle changed completely when he became an evangelical Christian, and in 1784 Wilberforce joined a leading group known as the Clapham Sect.
Himmelfarb for modernists--from Clapham Sect to Bloomsbury--was similar to that trodden by many workers as well.
She discusses in turn, therefore, women from the Latitudinarian and bluestockings circles of the mid eighteenth century onwards through the Whigs, Rational Dissenters, Unitarians, Radicals, Lunar Society and Clapham sect and Evangelicals of the late eighteenth to early nineteenth century, to the political economists, social interventionists, radical humanitarians and Froebelian missionaries and educators of the mid nineteenth century.
Wilberforce and his aristocratic evangelical colleagues (for example, Henry Thornton, Granville Sharp, John Venn, Hannah More, and Zachary Macaulay), dubbed as "Saints" (123) by their contemporaries and later known as the Clapham Sect, were infused with a combined Christian sense of noblesse oblige and paternalism.
Skaggs offers an interesting perspective through the banker Henry Thornton, whose historical contribution includes his role in the founding of the Clapham Sect.