Clare


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Clare

(klɛə)
n
(Placename) a county of W Republic of Ireland, in Munster between Galway Bay and the Shannon estuary. County town: Ennis. Pop: 103 277 (2002). Area: 3188 sq km (1231 sq miles)

Clare

(klɛə)
n
1. (Biography) Anthony (Ward). 1942–2007, Irish psychiatrist and broadcaster; presenter of the radio series In the Psychiatrist's Chair from 1982
2. (Biography) John. 1793–1864, English poet, noted for his descriptions of country life, particularly in The Shepherd's Calendar (1827) and The Rural Muse (1835). He was confined in a lunatic asylum from 1837

Clare

(klɛər)

n.
a county in W Republic of Ireland. 87,489; 1231 sq. mi. (3190 sq. km).
Translations
Clare
References in classic literature ?
Angel Clare rises out of the past not altogether as a distinct figure, but as an appreciative voice, a long regard of fixed, abstracted eyes, and a mobility of mouth somewhat too small and delicately lined for a man's, though with an unexpectedly firm close of the lower lip now and then; enough to do away with any inference of indecision.
Mr Clare the elder, whose first wife had died and left him a daughter, married a second late in life.
Some two or three years before Angel's appearance at the Marlott dance, on a day when he had left school and was pursuing his studies at home, a parcel came to the Vicarage from the local bookseller's, directed to the Reverend James Clare.
Clare the elder inhabited an unpretending little cottage, situated just outside the shrubbery fence which marked the limit of the Combe-Raven grounds.
Clare meeting him with the keen edged-tools of sophistry.
Clare used sometimes to walk across from his cottage (in his dressing-gown and slippers), and look at the boys disparagingly, through the window or over the fence, as if they were three wild animals whom his neighbor was attempting to tame.
Clare, Hero and Martyr, who Always Vanquished his Enemies and Always Spared Them, and Was Treacherously Slain by Them At Last.
Clare were both heroes--the old thing, and no mistake; it was like the fight between Hector and Achilles.
Clare was a soldier of the old religious type --the type that saved us during the Mutiny," continued Brown.
Clare was the son of a wealthy planter of Louisiana.
Clare could not even see that they had been broken.
Clare was sickly; but it seems he was very liable to sick-headaches, and that it was a very unfortunate thing for her, because he didn't enjoy going into company with her, and it seemed odd to go so much alone, when they were just married.