loratadine

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Related to Claritin: Benadryl

lor·at·a·dine

 (lôr-ăt′ə-dēn′)
n.
A nonsedating antihistamine, C22H23ClN2O2, used to treat allergic rhinitis and other allergic disorders.

[(ch)lor(o)- + (az)atadine, antihistamine from which it is derived (probably alteration of azo- + (hep)ta- + -(i)d(e) + -ine).]
Translations

loratadine

n loratadina
References in periodicals archive ?
While a poor showing by private label products left sales flat in the three months ended September 4, gains were posted by switched brands including Claritin, Zyrtec and Allegra.
The pharmaceutical company's marketing campaign for its grape-flavored chewable children's allergy drug Claritin includes free stickers, a mail-in movie ticket voucher and games highlighting DreamWorks Animation SKG Inc.
Children's Claritin Chewable Tablets (Ioratadine 5 mg, Schering-Plough HealthCare Products)
Schering-Plough, developer of the Claritin and Clarinex allergy drugs, has been working on a turnaround program since Claritin lost patent protection in 2002, leading to three years of losses.
Claritin, Schering-Plough's popular antihistamine, has been over the counter for years; Clarinex, a virtually identical drug from the same maker, is prescription-only.
Because Claritin and Claritin-D are available without a prescription, second-generation antihistamines are often second or third tier on insurance formularies.
Schering-Plough failed to perform proper rebates on the allergy medication Claritin.
5 million fine for paying a kickback to a customer in exchange for preferred treatment for its blockbuster drug Claritin.
O'Donnell said prescription or over-the-counter antihistamines, including Claritin and Chlor-Trimeton or Contac, can protect the allergy sufferer.
In December 2003, Claritin, a popular allergy medication, became available without a prescription at a very low price.
In late 2002, the Food and Drug Administration allowed the allergy drug Claritin to be sold over the counter, requiring allergy sufferers in the United States--as many as 50 million people--to pay out of pocket for the full price of the drug.
The Food and Drug Administration has approved a change to over-the-counter status for the antihistamine Claritin (loratadine) for treatment of the symptoms of allergic rhinitis.