Classical Chinese

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Related to Classical Chinese language: Literary Chinese

Classical Chinese

n.
The written form of Chinese from about the fifth century bc to the end of the Han dynasty in ad 220.
adj.
Of or relating to Classical Chinese.
References in periodicals archive ?
Descriptions of classical Chinese language stress the lack of copulative or so called auxiliary verbs.
There were a few old calligraphers who found very subtle ways of using very complicated classical Chinese language and writing to express their dissatisfaction with what was happening," says Barrass, who donated his personal collection of calligraphy to the British Museum.
As we have globalized our thinking, we have become more accustomed to thinking in terms of classical antiquity of other cultural traditions, such as Classical Chinese language of the Zhou Dynasty which dates back three millennia, and Indian classical music with a history of over five centuries.
After these remarks on the, at least, dual entity of Hong Kong literature from the point of view of language--a constant and deep relationship with classical Chinese language, far from the Maoist simplified expression and an aspiration toward, as well as an influence from, English language--I would like to investigate how the junction, or the crossing, between heterogeneous elements contributes to the creation of what I see as very original writings.
The style is indebted to the classical Chinese language.
Watson is a scholar and professional translator, versed not only in the Classical Chinese language but also in the Chinese and Japanese commentorial traditions concerning this poem.
Part of the problem is in the nature of the classical Chinese language.
In examining what he calls the "logical features" and "logical concepts" of the Classical Chinese language Christoph Harbsmeier has shown in this volume of Science and Civilisation in China that "logic is logic" and that, like mathematics, physics, and chemistry, for example, logic in China is no different from logic in the West in its primary, fundamental nature.
1-26) include a short section on the history of Western studies of Classical Chinese language and logic, and a discussion of the Classical Chinese language itself (pp.
Harbsmeier's discussion of the study of Classical Chinese language and logic in the West is slim, often little more than a briefly annotated chronological listing of names, primary texts, and secondary scholarship.
When Harbsmeier turns his attention to the logical features of the Classical Chinese language, he inevitably and naturally treats them in grammatical terms, attesting to the unarguable fact that grammar is the first reflection of logic in language.
The distinction between the two types of sentences is fundamental to the Classical Chinese language and is explicitly marked in the use of different negatives for each.
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