Clausius


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Clau·si·us

 (klou′zē-o͝os), Rudolf 1822-1888.
German mathematician and physicist noted for his work on the laws of thermodynamics.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Clausius

(German ˈklauziʊs)
n
(Biography) Rudolf Julius (ˈruːdɔlf ˈjuːliʊs). 1822–88, German physicist and mathematician. He enunciated the second law of thermodynamics (1850) and developed the kinetic theory of gases
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References in periodicals archive ?
In Section 3, the unified first law of gravitational thermodynamics and the Clausius equation on [Y.sub.A] for an isochoric process in EBI Universe were discussed.
(34) In 1850, such limitation was affirmed by Clausius in a statement that is now regarded as an expression of the second law of thermodynamics, the principle of conservation of energy being the first one.
Clausius coined it some 150 years ago from the ancient Greek word for `transformation'.
combined with the Clausius relation (Td[S.sub.A] = -[delta][Q.sup.m]), to get [8, 15]
to drive the work; but the faster any work is accomplished, the less of the energy is used that way, because more of it is lost instead through contamination by entropy (Carnot 1824, Clausius 1851).
The practice of making such cosmic claims for entropy dates back to Rudolph Clausius, the physicist who originally coined the term.
This approach soon generalized to the cosmological situation, where it was shown that, by applying the Clausius relation to the apparent horizon of the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) universe, the Friedmann equation can be rewritten in the form of the first law of thermodynamics [21].
The amount of dissipated energy of a physical system is its entropy (Clausius, 1879).
where we used Td[S.sub.A] [equivalent to] -[delta][Q.sup.m] (the Clausius relation) and V = (4[pi]/3)[[??].sup.3.sub.A] (aerial volume) relations to obtain this equation [20, 21, 32, 64].
Clausius and Clapeyron make their annual appearance.