clergyman

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cler·gy·man

 (klûr′jē-mən)
n.
A man who is a member of the clergy.

clergyman

(ˈklɜːdʒɪmən)
n, pl -men
(Ecclesiastical Terms) a member of the clergy. Gender-neutral form: vicar or priest

cler•gy•man

(ˈklɜr dʒi mən)

n., pl. -men.
a member of the clergy.
[1570–80]
usage: See -man.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.clergyman - a member of the clergy and a spiritual leader of the Christian Churchclergyman - a member of the clergy and a spiritual leader of the Christian Church
clergy - in Christianity, clergymen collectively (as distinguished from the laity)
spiritual leader - a leader in religious or sacred affairs
acolyte - someone who assists a priest or minister in a liturgical service; a cleric ordained in the highest of the minor orders in the Roman Catholic Church but not in the Anglican Church or the Eastern Orthodox Churches
anagnost - a cleric in the minor orders of the Eastern Orthodox Church who reads the lessons aloud in the liturgy (analogous to the lector in the Roman Catholic Church)
archdeacon - (Anglican Church) an ecclesiastical dignitary usually ranking just below a bishop
chaplain - a clergyman ministering to some institution
churchman, cleric, ecclesiastic, divine - a clergyman or other person in religious orders
curate, minister, minister of religion, parson, pastor, rector - a person authorized to conduct religious worship; "clergymen are usually called ministers in Protestant churches"
deacon - a cleric ranking just below a priest in Christian churches; one of the Holy Orders
domine, dominee, dominie, dominus - a clergyman; especially a settled minister or parson
ostiarius, ostiary, doorkeeper - the lowest of the minor Holy Orders in the unreformed Western Church but now suppressed by the Roman Catholic Church
lector, reader - someone who reads the lessons in a church service; someone ordained in a minor order of the Roman Catholic Church
officiant - a clergyman who officiates at a religious ceremony or service
ordinand - a person being ordained
ordinary - a clergyman appointed to prepare condemned prisoners for death
postulator - (Roman Catholic Church) someone who proposes or pleads for a candidate for beatification or canonization
preacher, preacher man, sermoniser, sermonizer - someone whose occupation is preaching the gospel
priest - a clergyman in Christian churches who has the authority to perform or administer various religious rites; one of the Holy Orders
shepherd - a clergyman who watches over a group of people
subdeacon - a clergyman an order below deacon; one of the Holy Orders in the unreformed western Christian church and the eastern Catholic Churches but now suppressed in the Roman Catholic Church
vicar - (Church of England) a clergyman appointed to act as priest of a parish
vicar - (Episcopal Church) a clergyman in charge of a chapel
layman, layperson, secular - someone who is not a clergyman or a professional person

clergyman

noun minister, priest, vicar, parson, reverend (informal), rabbi, pastor, chaplain, cleric, rector, curate, father, churchman, padre, man of God, man of the cloth, divine The crowds were protesting against a local clergyman being banned from preaching.
Quotations
"The clergyman is expected to be a kind of human Sunday" [Samuel Butler The Way of All Flesh]

clergyman

noun
A person ordained for service in a Christian church:
Informal: reverend.
Translations
كاهِن، قِس
duchovníkněz
gejstligpræst
lelkészpap
prestur, klerkur

clergyman

[ˈklɜːdʒɪmən] N (clergymen (pl)) → clérigo m; (Anglican) → pastor m anglicano; (Protestant) → pastor m protestante

clergyman

[ˈklɜːrdʒimən] necclésiastique m

clergyman

n pl <-men> → Geistliche(r) m, → Pastor m, → Pfarrer m

clergyman

[ˈklɜːdʒɪmən] n (-men (pl)) → ecclesiastico

clergy

(ˈkləːdʒi) noun
the ministers, priests etc of the Christian religion. the clergy of the Church of England.
ˈclergyman noun
one of the clergy; a priest, minister etc.

clergyman

n. clérigo.
References in periodicals archive ?
puts it, clergywomen "still face an uphill struggle as third-class leaders" (321).
Synopsis: Appreciative readers of "There's a Woman in the Pulpit: Christian Clergywomen Share Their Hard Days, Holy Moments and the Healing Power of Humor", compiled and edited Reverend Martha Spong (a United Church of Christ pastor, who is also the director of RevGalBlogPals--a social media ministry making community for clergywomen across lines of denomination, generation, nation and orientation since 2005) will earn and laugh with these women of the church, bound together by a deep commitment to ministry, as they reveal what it really means to be a woman in the pulpit.
She was seen as a spiritual mother of many clergywomen, especially women bishops.
Among the topics are a sociological perspective, an empirical study among Dutch young people on separation of church and state and freedom of religion, religion's construction of public significance through the bioethical discourse, the changing experiences of clergywomen in the Church of England, accessing the ordinary theology of personal prayer, how Christian students in Tamil Nadu think about power-driven religious conflicts, how Catholic teachers of religion from five European countries perceived other religions, and religion in German preschool education as a public issue still denied.
We are going to redeploy troops of the two parties from where they are now stationed, and will leave Cambodian Buddhist monks and clergywomen in the pagoda,'' Hun Sen said.
Likewise, clergical cemeteries in the region, or other non-clerical cemeteries with burials of clergywomen and men, such as Albury, Beechworth, and Wagga Wagga do not have full-length Latin inscriptions.
In 2000, the SBC revoked the decision, leaving about 1,600 Southern Baptist clergywomen in an ambiguous position.
However, clergywomen assume these dual roles alone, while balancing family responsibilities.
TV VICAR Dawn French joined 200 clergywomen seeking an end to world poverty yesterday.
Canon Caroline Dick and Revs Mary Judson, Val Shedden and Elaine Srivens from Durham, together with Joan Dotchin, Sheila Hamil and Jenny Lancaster from Newcastle, were joined by hundreds of other clergywomen from across the country.
The card, signed by clergy of all denominations, was presented by French - who plays The Vicar of Dibley on TV - and a delegation of 10 clergywomen.