climate

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Related to Climate system: climate change

cli·mate

 (klī′mĭt)
n.
1. The meteorological conditions, including temperature, precipitation, and wind, that characteristically prevail in a particular region.
2. A region of the earth having particular meteorological conditions: lives in a cold climate.
3. A prevailing condition or set of attitudes in human affairs: a climate of unrest.

[Middle English climat, from Old French, from Late Latin clima, climat-, from Greek klima, surface of the earth, region; see klei- in Indo-European roots.]

climate

(ˈklaɪmɪt)
n
1. (Physical Geography) the long-term prevalent weather conditions of an area, determined by latitude, position relative to oceans or continents, altitude, etc
2. (Physical Geography) an area having a particular kind of climate
3. a prevailing trend or current of feeling: the political climate.
[C14: from Late Latin clima, from Greek klima inclination, region; related to Greek klinein to lean]
climatic, cliˈmatical, ˈclimatal adj
cliˈmatically adv
Usage: Climatic is sometimes wrongly used where climactic is meant. Climatic is properly used to talk about things relating to climate; climactic is used to describe something which forms a climax

cli•mate

(ˈklaɪ mɪt)

n.
1. the composite or generally prevailing weather conditions of a region, as temperature, air pressure, humidity, precipitation, cloudiness, and winds, throughout the year, averaged over a series of years.
2. a region or area characterized by a given climate: to move to a warm climate.
3. the prevailing attitudes, standards, or conditions of a group, period, or place: a climate of political unrest.
[1350–1400; Middle English: region, latitude < Latin clīmat-, s. of clīma < Greek klima <kli(nein) to slope, lean]
cli•mat′ic (-ˈmæt ɪk) adj.

cli·mate

(klī′mĭt)
The general or average weather conditions of a certain region, including temperature, rainfall, and wind: Caribbean islands have a year-round climate of warm breezes and sunshine.

Climate


the science of the description of climate. — climatographer, n. — climatographical, adj.
the science that studies climate or climatic conditions. — climatologist, n. — climatologic, climatological, adj.
the climate of the inside of a building, airliner, or space ship, as distinguished from that on the outside.
the study of the geographical distribution of rainfall by annual totals. — hyetographic, hyetographical, adj.
the science that studies climate and weather variations. — meteorologie, meteorological, adj. — meteorologist, n.
1. the study of minute gradations in climate that are due to the nature of the terrain.
2. the study of microclimates or climates of limited areas, as houses or communities. — microclimatologist, n. — microclimatologic, microclimatological, adj.
the branch of biology that studies the relation between variations in climate and periodic biological phenomena, as the migration of birds or the flowering of plants. — phenologist, n. — phenologic, phenological, adj.

climate


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The average weather of a region or place measured for all seasons over a number of years. There are three important areas: tropical, temperate and polar.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.climate - the weather in some location averaged over some long period of timeclimate - the weather in some location averaged over some long period of time; "the dank climate of southern Wales"; "plants from a cold clime travel best in winter"
environmental condition - the state of the environment
2.climate - the prevailing psychological state; "the climate of opinion"; "the national mood had changed radically since the last election"
condition, status - a state at a particular time; "a condition (or state) of disrepair"; "the current status of the arms negotiations"

climate

noun
1. weather, country, region, temperature, clime the hot and humid climate of Cyprus
2. atmosphere, environment, spirit, surroundings, tone, mood, trend, flavour, feeling, tendency, temper, ambience, vibes (slang) A major change of political climate is unlikely.
Quotations
"You don't need a weatherman to know which way the wind blows" [Bob Dylan Subterranean Homesick Blues]

climate

noun
1. The totality of surrounding conditions and circumstances affecting growth or development:
2. A prevailing quality, as of thought, behavior, or attitude:
Translations
مُناخمُناخ عاممُناخ، طَقْس
klimapodnebípoměryovzduší
klima
ilmastoilmanalailmapiiri
klima
éghajlatklíma
andi, andrúmsloft, aîstæîurloftslag
気候
기후
klimatasklimatinisklimatosąlygos
klimats
pomery
podnebjeklima
klimat
อากาศ
khí hậu

climate

[ˈklaɪmɪt] Nclima m (fig) → ambiente m
the climate of opinion (fig) → la opinión general

climate

[ˈklaɪmət] n
(= weather) → climat m
(political, economic)climat mclimate change nchangement m climatiqueclimate control n (in car or building) (= air conditioning) → climatisation f

climate

n (lit, fig)Klima nt; the two countries have very different climatesdie beiden Länder haben (ein) sehr unterschiedliches Klima; America has many different climatesAmerika hat viele verschiedene Klimazonen; to move to a warmer climatein eine wärmere Gegend or in eine Gegend mit wärmerem Klima ziehen; the climate of public opiniondie Stimmung in der Öffentlichkeit, das öffentliche Klima; climate conference (Pol) → Klimakonferenz for -gipfel m

climate

[ˈklaɪmɪt] nclima m
the climate of popular opinion → l'opinione pubblica

climate

(ˈklaimət) noun
1. the weather conditions of a region (temperature, moisture etc). Britain has a temperate climate.
2. the conditions in a country etc. the economic/moral climate.
cliˈmatic (-ˈmӕ-) adjective

climate

مُناخ podnebí klima Klima κλίμα clima ilmasto climat klima clima 気候 기후 klimaat klima klimat clima климат klimat อากาศ iklim khí hậu 气候

climate

n. clima.

climate

n clima m
References in periodicals archive ?
Surprisingly enough, these two events are a natural part of the global climate system. Because of this, keeping a close watch on the call-and-response relationship that happens on the eastern Pacific can give people a good indication whether an El Nino or a La Nina is coming.
"Land plays an important role in the climate system," said Jim Skea, Co-Chair of IPCC Working Group III.
However, the mechanisms behind this relationship have remained unclear so far, mainly due to the chaotic nature of the climate system. This has changed with the publication of an article in Nature Climate Change, with honorary Professor Richard Bintanja from the University of Groningen as one of the co-authors.
Personal climate technology company Tempronics has announced the introduction of the PCS-T200 Personal Climate System that addresses personal comfort for vehicles and aircraft, the company said.
The latest temperature records provided fresh evidence that the buildup of carbon emissions in the atmosphere is destabilizing Earth's climate system faster than scientists had expected, said Stephan Harrison, a professor of climate and environmental change at Britain's University of Exeter.
Global warming is a long-term rise in the average temperature of the Earth's climate system, an aspect of climate change shown by temperature measurements and by multiple effects of the warming.
Summary: Records are vital to understanding past variability in the global climate system
'In recent years, training activities have been undertaken in the following areas; Regional Climate System Modeling, Crop Simulation Modeling, Watershed Modeling, Downscaling of Climate Scenarios, Analysis of Climate Extremes and Food and Water Security', the officials said.
Meeting at the "Earth Summit" in Rio de Janeiro, they agreed to stabilize greenhouse gases "at a low enough level to prevent dangerous anthropogenic interference with the climate system."
Taken together, the large number of model simulations allowed the scientists to distinguish impacts linked to El Nino and La Nina from those caused by the natural chaos in the climate system.
Context:Major changes are occurring across the North Atlantic climate system: in ocean and atmosphere temperatures and circulation, in sea ice thickness and extent, and in key atmospheric constituents such as ozone, methane and particles known as aerosols.
This "hothouse" climate would make parts of the world uninhabitable.A joint study by international climate scientists from Germany, Sweden, Denmark and Australia presents a bleak prognosis: Even if the goals of the Paris climate agreement are achieved and global warming is limited to maxiumum 2 degrees Celsius (3.6 degrees Fahrenheit) compared to pre-industrial levels, the climate system could still pass a devastating tipping point.

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