Clisthenes


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Clis·the·nes

 (klĭs′thə-nēz′)
See Cleisthenes.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Clisthenes

(ˈklaɪsθəˌniːz)
n
(Biography) a variant spelling of Cleisthenes
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in classic literature ?
As, for instance, at Athens, after the expulsion of the tyrants, when Clisthenes enrolled many foreigners and city-slaves amongst the tribes; and the doubt with respect to them was, not whether they were citizens or no, but whether they were legally so or not.
In the introduction to his translation of Aristotle's On Rhetoric for example, Kennedy (1991) identified several environmental factors that influenced Aristotle's work including the contributions of the sophistic tradition to Attic thought, Socrates' critique of the sophistic tradition, and more generally the socio-political changes that occurred as the Athenian city-state adjusted to the reforms of Clisthenes. As such, it seems that considerations of the contextual elements as well as contributions of other classical writers may prove to be a valuable resource for understanding classical thought in the context of pragma-dialectical argumentation studies.
Reformers like Solon, Clisthenes, and Lycurgus appear cautious and respectful of traditional religious forms, organizations, and structures even when introducing new--or reorganizing old--patterns of political and religious life.
Tragic competitions may have been instituted by the fledgling democracy (argued by Connor), but the organization of the City Dionysia seems to antedate Clisthenes' tribal reform (C.
Herodotus (6.131.1) designated Clisthenes as 'the man who established the tribes and the democracy'.