ramet

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ra·met

 (rā′mĭt)
n.
A physiologically distinct organism that is part of a group of genetically identical individuals derived from one progenitor, as a tree in a group of trees that have all sprouted from a single parent plant.

[Latin rāmus, branch; see ramus + -et.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

ramet

(ˈræmɪt)
n
any of the individuals in a group of clones
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

ra•met

(ˈreɪ mɪt)

n.
an individual of a clone.
[1925–30; < Latin rām(us) branch + -et]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Covering some 106 acres (43 ha) in south-central Utah's Fishlake National Forest, the clonal colony consists of more than 47,000 genetically identical above-ground stems or "ramets" originating from a single underground parent clone.
"There does seem to be something more than just a clonal colony of bacteria," says paleobiologist Philip Donoghue of the University of Bristol in England.
"You can clearly see the first individual that founded a sexual colony, while a clonal colony preserves the fragment from the previous colony from which it cloned," he added.