Close vowel


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Related to Close vowel: Open vowel
(Pron.) a vowel which is pronounced with a diminished aperture of the lips, or with contraction of the cavity of the mouth.
See under Close, a.

See also: Close, Vowel

References in periodicals archive ?
With increasing fundamental pitch, the soprano will lower the jaw accordingly, and the close vowel /i/ will be perceived as /e/, then /ae/, and in the very high pitches all vowels will sound like /a/ or /A/.
The paper discusses the early i-/y-spellings which may indicate the narrowing of the long mid close vowel [e: > i:] even before the 15th century, a date generally considered the initial stage of the Great Vowel Shift.
It often involves a greater openness of a close vowel in very high registers, for the sake of beauty of tone and technical well-being.
However this study of vowel duration is not supporting the claim of Lindblom (1967) that open vowels tend to be longer than close vowels as the duration of close vowel lu (266) is more than the open vowel Ia
long category oppositions in close vowel /i/ and open vowel /a/ in CV(:)CV carrier words was designed.
To avoid this behavior upon ascending the range, males should stay in fairly close vowel posture until the vowel being sung turns over--that is, until the second harmonic surpasses the first formant, achieving close timbre--and a bit beyond.
The closing diphthongs are /oi/, and /ai/ as these end in the close vowel /1 /while/ua/ is a centring diphthong as it ends in the central vowel /a/.
All close vowel phonemes have both long and short allophones ([e:]-[e], [i:]-[i], [o:]-[o], etc.
The vowels in the speech of the older age group form a quadrilateral which is characteristic to other Finnic languages, whereas in the case of the younger speakers we can observe a tendency typical to this region: the back vowel /a/ has shifted towards the /o/ (raised), which in its turn has resulted in the shift of the mid-high /o/ towards the close vowel /u/.
12) With increasing fundamental pitch, the soprano will lower the jaw accordingly and the close vowel /i/ will be perceived as /e/, then /a/, and in the very high pitches all vowels will sound like /a/.
A close vowel can therefore be sung in open timbre, and an open vowel in close timbre, depending upon range relative to the first formant of the vowel being sung.
1) Exercises that leap from a low open vowel [a] to a high close vowel [u].