thrombolysis

(redirected from Clot busting)
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Related to Clot busting: tissue plasminogen activator, rt-PA

throm·bol·y·sis

 (thrŏm-bŏl′ĭ-sĭs)
n. pl. throm·bol·y·ses (-sēz)
Dissolution or destruction of a thrombus.

throm′bo·lyt′ic (-bə-lĭt′ĭk) adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

thrombolysis

(ˌθrɒmˈbɒlɪsɪs)
n
(Medicine) the breaking up of a blood clot
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.thrombolysis - the process of breaking up and dissolving blood clots
lysis - (biochemistry) dissolution or destruction of cells such as blood cells or bacteria
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
trombolisi

throm·bol·y·sis

n. trombólisis, lisis o disolución de un coágulo.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

thrombolysis

n trombolisis f
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
| Clot busting drugs can be administered up to 4 1/2 hours after a stroke.
Those with a clot are treated with special clot busting drugs within 4hrs of stroke onset".
The Acute Stroke Unit at the RVI was the very first in England to provide clot busting treatment for stroke patients on a 24 hour basis.
The concert is celebrating 50 years of the British Heart Foundation which has aided the research and creation of pacemakers, clot busting medicines as well as funding nurses and equipment locally in North Wales.
Nearly 60,000 Australians suffer from a stroke each year, but only 20 pc are eligible to be treated with the clot busting drug tPA - tissue Plasminogen activator that reopens blood supply to the brain.
It is much more effective than the previous standard treatment - injecting a clot busting drug - and means patients are more likely to survive, have fewer complications and go home from hospital an average of four days sooner.
Stroke services lead Dr Elliot Epstein explained that thrombolysis entails administration of a 'clot busting' drug called alteplase.