clubhouse

(redirected from Clubhouses)
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club·house

 (klŭb′hous′)
n.
1.
a. A building occupied by a club.
b. A building used for socializing and usually meals at a sporting facility, such as a racetrack or golf course.
2. A building or room used by an athletic team as a locker room.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

clubhouse

(ˈklʌbˌhaʊs)
n
the premises of a sports or other club, esp a golf club
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

club•house

(ˈklʌbˌhaʊs)

n., pl. -hous•es (-ˌhaʊ zɪz)
1. a building or room occupied by a club or used for recreational activities.
2. the dressing room of an athletic team.
[1810–20]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.clubhouse - a building that is occupied by a social clubclubhouse - a building that is occupied by a social club; "the clubhouse needed a new roof"
building, edifice - a structure that has a roof and walls and stands more or less permanently in one place; "there was a three-story building on the corner"; "it was an imposing edifice"
clubroom - a room used for the activities of a club
reading room - a room set aside for reading
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

clubhouse

[ˈklʌbhaʊs] N (clubhouses (pl)) → sede f de un club
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

clubhouse

[ˈklʌbhaʊs] npavillon m, club-house m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

clubhouse

[ˈklʌbˌhaʊs] ncircolo
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
And it is a solemn fact that the English in this Eastern exile have contrived to make a small golf links out of the green scrub and sand; with a comfortable clubhouse at one end of it and this primeval monument at the other.
The clubhouse on the golf links was used, of course, for many other purposes besides that of golf.
Fisher did not see his friend until a fortnight later, when he found himself in the garden at the back of the clubhouse on the opposite side from the links, a garden heavily colored and scented with sweet semitropical plants in the glow of a desert sunset.
A moment or two after he had spoken they heard a voice hailing them out of the shadow of the clubhouse, and were astonished to perceive Travers hurrying toward them, calling out as he came:
Half an hour later Fisher was again walking to and fro in front of the clubhouse, with Captain Boyle, the latter by this time with a very buffeted and bewildered air; perhaps a sadder and a wiser man.
It was only for the first few moments, while the carriage was driving out of the clubhouse gates, that Levin was still under the influence of the club atmosphere of repose, comfort, and unimpeachable good form.
This gave him many friends--all of whom he had gotten together into the "War Whoop League," whose clubhouse you might see just outside of the yards.
The clubhouses are being funded by the 2017 bond package.The bond proposalallotted $10.5 million for Earlywine and $11.9 million for Lake Hefner.
John Sather of Swaback Partners designed the clubhouse. Sather's firm has designed renowned resort clubhouses includes Martis Camp in Lake Tahoe, Calif., and Promontory's Nicklaus Clubhouse in Park City, Utah.
When you think of the top clubhouses it's impossible to ignore the R&A clubhouse at St Andrews.
Its success has also become a model for other programs, which send their workers to Worcester to train to run their own clubhouses.